Dollars for Scholars

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Dollars for Scholars: American Opportunity Tax Credit

To help offset the high cost of college, the federal government has extended a tax credit program that could save students and their families up to $2500 per year--in cash back from the IRS for each year of college. Extension of the program - The American Opportunity Tax Credit - came as part of the Tax Relief Unemployment Insurance Re-authorization and Job Creation Act signed into law by President Barack Obama in December. One problem: Many qualified applicants don't take advantage of the opportunity. But now is the time to take another look because the new law expands categories of eligible taxpayers, including those who may not have qualified in past years. more >

 

Dollars for Scholars: : Apply for Financial Aid

Think You're Not Eligible for Financial Aid? Think Again. If your family's financial status has changed due to economic hardship such as a job loss, death or divorce, that could affect your ability to pay tuition - and your eligibility for financial aid. Check now with your college financial aid counselors. You might be newly eligible for a Pell grant, or if you already have one, receive more money. Counselors will also have information about money available through the New York State Tuition Assistance Program. more >

 

Dollars for Scholars: The CUNY Value

Did you know that CUNY offers the best value in both good and challenging economic times? CUNY Value represents high-quality academics at lower cost than other metropolitan area schools - public and private - due to our affordable tuition structure and financial aid for lower-income students. CUNY students also end up borrowing less for education, and owing less at graduation, than do other students. CUNY produces well-prepared, competitive graduates ready for in-demand New York careers from business to nursing, technology to teaching. more >

 

Dollars for Scholars: Financial Aid Tips from Alice Murphy

Paying for college can be a struggle even in the best economic times. Alice Murphey, the University's director of financial aid management, can help. Murphey has been guiding students and families through the college financial aid process for 30 years. Here she shares her expertise about how to make college more affordable - including filing financial aid applications, identifying scholarships and budgeting wisely. more >

 

Dollars for Scholars: Summer in the City

Consider summer classes to stay on track for graduation. Summer in the City - a wealth of course offerings at CUNY colleges throughout the five boroughs - is just around the corner. Courses are offered in Summer 2011 at the same tuition rate as the Spring. Using e permit, you may find a course at another CUNY college that will help you satisfy requirements at your home college. Check out the special site with more information. more >

 

Dollars for Scholars: Earned Income

April is tax-filing month and if you're a low income, working student, you may be eligible for the federal Earned Income Tax Credit - extra cash for college and other costs. Last year 1.7 million New Yorkers collected an average of $2,136 in EITC payments. The maximum is $5,666 for taxpayers who have at least three children and earn less than $48,362. But if you're single, age 25 to 64, and earn less than $13,460 you may also be eligible. Go to IRS.gov and type EITC into the search box to check. You must file a tax return to receive the credit. An added bonus: If you qualify for the federal tax credit, chances are you qualify for New York State's EITC as well. more >

 

Dollars for Scholars: Up to $2500 Tax Credit on Federal Income Tax Return

To help offset the high cost of college, the federal government has extended a tax credit program that could save students and their families up to $2500 per year--in cash back from the IRS for each year of college. Extension of the program - The American Opportunity Tax Credit - came as part of the Tax Relief Unemployment Insurance Re-authorization and Job Creation Act signed into law by President Barack Obama in December. One problem: Many qualified applicants don't take advantage of the opportunity. But now is the time to take another look because the new law expands categories of eligible taxpayers, including those who may not have qualified in past years. more >