2012-2013 Progress Reports

Goal #1.1: Accelerated Study in Associate Programs

Team leader: Mogulescu

Team members: Linderman, Wilks, Wrigley

Summary:

ASAP goals for 2012-2013 included continuing to scale the program to serve more students with the goal of serving over 4,000 students in 2014, and continuing to identify essential program elements found to be most beneficial for adoption across CUNY.  ASAP continued to serve current and incoming fall 2012 students, with an emphasis on expedited completion of developmental coursework and rigorous program evaluation.


Progress toward success indicators:

ASAP exceeded its fall 2012 enrollment target and recruited 1,515 new students who began their studies in fall 2012 realizing a total enrollment of 2,207 students. ASAP services identified as essential to program success included intrusive advisement, immediate/continuous developmental course taking, and use of winter/summer sessions. 

Current ASAP students continue to realize impressive outcomes. Combined cohort highlights include a 23 percent 2-year graduation rate, 40 percent 2.5-year graduation rate, and 53 percent 3-year graduation rate.  ASAP has also improved its ability to move more students towards skills proficiency. A cross-cohort analysis on skills proficiency at the one-year mark shows only 16 percent of ASAP students have remaining developmental needs compared to 44 percent of comparison group students. 

A two-part cost-benefit study on ASAP was completed by Dr. Henry Levin and the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies in Education at Teachers College.  Part one released in September 2012 found that the average cost per three-year ASAP graduate is $6,500 lower than comparison group graduates. Part two released in June 2013 highlighted ASAP’s very large financial returns for both the taxpayer and the ASAP student, most notably net benefits associated with an initial enrollment of 1,000 ASAP students that are $46 million higher than that of a comparison group.

 

Plans and timeline: 

All colleges worked with CUNY partner programs and citywide college access staff to target eligible students to support recruitment of 1,800 new students for fall 2013.  Robin Hood funding at $1 million has been renewed for another year to support ASAP expansion. ASAP will also receive funding from New York State in the amount of $1.7 million for FY14 and also received a two-year award of $1 million from the Stella and Charles Guttman Foundation.  MDRC completed impact evaluation work at colleges in spring 2013 and will continue to assess data provided by the ASAP Research and Evaluation team for the random assignment study. An interim report is due from MDRC in early 2014.  

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Goal #1.2: Work with the NYC Department of Education through Graduate NYC! to increase the number of students who meet proficiency standards upon entry and to increase graduation rates at CUNY

Team leader: Mogulescu

Team members: Conrad, Mack, Steering Committee

 

Summary:

This team has worked to implement curricular units aligned to the Common Core State Standards developed collaboratively by CUNY and DOE faculty; launch an Internet-based portal, NYC College Line, to provide detailed information and resources on college access and support services for NYC students, families, and professionals; develop and launch an Innovation Fund to support promising programs that enhance high school students' college completion rates; and secure additional external funding to support the initiative.


Progress toward success indicators:

Curriculum Alignment Project

  • CUNY faculty and DOE high school teachers worked together to develop aligned curriculum units in math and English.  Units were developed in each subject for use in high school, developmental education and college gateway courses. The aligned curriculum units were piloted during the fall 2012 semester.
  • A final report and recommendations from the Project was produced in February 2013.
  • Graduate NYC! issued a Call for Proposals to CUNY Centers for Teaching and Learning to develop local curriculum alignment activities. Proposals will be reviewed in July 2013.

NYC College Line

  • An innovative new website that provides a wide range of information resources to students, families, and professional advisors in New York City, NYC College Line, was launched  in February 2013. As of June 2013 approximately 2,000 unique users per week were accessing the site’s resources.

Innovation Fund

  • Graduate NYC! has engaged a development consultant to advise on the feasibility of raising sufficient funds for the Innovation Fund. 
  • A strategic plan is in place to for funder outreach during the second half of 2013.

CUNY-DOE Steering Committee

  • Graduate NYC! supported the CUNY-DOE Steering Committee in the creation of a Charter for the group, and a quarterly data review calendar.
  • Graduate NYC! will work with Steering Committee members to develop the first annual report on College Readiness and Success issues during the third quarter of 2013.

Plans and timeline:

With the Gates-funded National League of Cities grant supporting GraduateNYC !coming to an end, the project is actively seeking other sources of funding as well as positioning itself for the next City administration.

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Goal #1.3: Expand CUNY Start accelerated developmental education programs

Team leader: Mogulescu

Team members: Linderman, Simon, Cooper-Shpirt

Summary:

The team oversaw the expansion of CUNY Start at its seven existing campuses, increasing enrollment from 1,200 in FY12 to over 1,600 in FY13. The team also ensured that individual programs worked productively with all relevant campus offices so that prospective students were informed about the program and developed a plan for long-term evaluation of the program with CUNY’s Research and Evaluation unit. 

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • In 2012-2013, CUNY Start increased enrollment at its seven participating colleges. The program enrolled 1,634 students across the fall 2012 and spring 2013 semesters.
  • CUNY Start students continued to realize significant reduction in their developmental needs as a result of program participation.  Of the 461 students who enrolled in fall 2012 full-time programs, 348 (75 percent) entered with three remedial needs and 113 (25 percent) entered with two remedial needs. Upon exit, only 77 (17 percent) had three remaining remedial needs, 69 (15 percent) had two remaining remedial needs, 112 (24 percent) had one remaining remedial need, and 203 (44 percent) finished the semester fully skills proficient.
  • Fall 2012 was the first semester that CUNY Start math students took the CUNY Elementary Algebra Final Exam (CEAFE) as an exit exam; CUNY Start students passed the exam at higher rates than students in the typical remedial math courses: 62 percent vs. 36 percent.

 

Plans and timeline:

  • Spring 2013 CUNY Start students will complete their program in July and August of 2013, when final test results will be available. 
  • CUNY Start’s Research and Evaluation team re-ran its preliminary data from the August 2012 study, adding fall 2012 data and expanding analysis. The report again showed strong results similar to the initial study: CUNY Start students are more likely to exit remediation, at higher rates and more quickly than similar students who matriculated immediately after admission to CUNY. CUNY Start students also earned more college credits with higher GPAs than comparison group students.
  • Recruitment for fall 2013 is underway and will be completed by August 2013. CUNY Start added a new full-time program at Medgar Evers College, which will serve 100 students in FY14.  In total, 1,750 CUNY Start students will enter the program in fall 2013, and 2,050 in spring 2014 with an overall goal of enrolling 3,800 students in FY14.
CUNY Start has entered discussions with MDRC and the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College to secure funding for a major random assignment study of CUNY Start to commence in 2015.

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Goal #1.4: Review trends in new program development at CUNY, establish curricular profiles of colleges, and recommend improvements in the program review process

Team leader: Wrigley

Team members: Croke, Crook,  Norz, Sukhanova,Wilks, Zoe

Summary:

The Working Group developed an overview of the CUNY curriculum across its different colleges, reviewed trends in new program development, and developed recommendations for improving the review of proposed academic programs.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

The CUNY curriculum has seldom been studied on a system level. This has made it hard to have a context for the review of new programs and has limited analysis of how the overall shape of the curriculum has changed over time. To provide an initial understanding of the curriculum, the Working Group reviewed data on the following:

  • the number of academic programs at CUNY
  • variation in average program size by college and degree level
  • the distribution of academic programs into liberal arts and professional categories and variations in this balance by college
  • variation in graduation-to-enrollment ratios across programs
  • trends in new program development
  • divergence between anticipated enrollments in new programs as set forth in program proposals and actual enrollments

The Working Group developed recommendations on streamlining the academic program review process while maintaining careful review procedures.

 

Plans and timeline:

A revised report on trends in the CUNY curriculum will be presented to EVC Logue for discussion of its recommendations before the end of August 2013.

 

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Goal #1.5: To align CUNY’s nursing programs with professional trends by increasing the University’s capacity to enroll and graduate students at the baccalaureate level

Team leader: Ebenstein,

Team members: Mogulescu, Wrigley

Summary:

The team has sought to: 1) increase curricular options in nursing at the baccalaureate level including an online RN-BS degree program; 2) increase the number of baccalaureate graduates as a percentage of all undergraduate nursing graduates; and 3) develop AAS/BS dual degree programs in nursing.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The total number of BS nurse graduates increased from 567 in 2010-11 to 589 in 2011-12; the number of BS nurse graduates as a percentage of all undergraduate nurse graduates increased to 37% in 2011-12; the number of students enrolled in BS nursing programs as a percentage of all undergraduate nursing enrollments increased to 43% in 2011-2012.
  • A new online RN-BS to be offered through SPS was approved by SED; an academic director has been hired and a second f/t nurse faculty member is being recruited; enrollment in the program will start in the spring 2014 semester.
  • In 2011-12 a cohort of 25 students enrolled in the new generic BS in Nursing offered through York College.
  • The QCC-Hunter AAS/BS dual degree continues to enroll new cohorts; the QCC-York AAS/BS dual degree has been approved by SED and students are enrolling as of fall 2013; NYCCT and MEC are exploring AAS/BS dual degree options in nursing including a 1-2-1 model; AAS/BS dual degrees between BCC, Hostos, and LaGuardia and Lehman are being finalized.

Plans and timeline:

Curriculum and program development related to AAS/BS dual degrees in nursing, including the 1-2-1 dual degree model, will continue.

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Goal #1.6: To design and implement a University-wide nursing faculty development initiative

Team leader: Ebenstein

Team member: Wrigley

Summary:

The team will provide opportunities for nursing faculty to participate in a series of workshops, seminars, and online courses in areas such as simulation, informatics, and inter-professional education. Using assessments/evaluations, observe improvements in knowledge and competencies.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • A new online Professional Development Needs Assessment survey, conducted in December 2012, included responses from 119 F/T and 72 P/T CUNY nursing faculty. The survey conducted by Nursing Faculty Fellow Dr. Marge Reilly included questions spanning demographics and career and faculty development. The survey data was presented to the Nursing Discipline Council to inform its faculty development activities.
  • Two university-wide conferences were held: one was on the Affordable Care Act with a guest speaker from the office of  U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius; the other was a collaborative conference with the National League for Nursing on “Advancing Care Excellence for Seniors” that awarded CEUs to participants.
  • An 18-month subscription to a series of 65 faculty development webinars was purchased, allowing all CUNY f/t and p/t nursing faculty to have access to current information on critical topics in nurse education. CEUs are awarded to participants.
  • An inter-professional education (IPE) group was convened to examine ways to enhance faculty awareness of IPE, explore ways to establish collaborations among faculty from several health professions and to discuss strategies for the integration of IPE into the curriculum across disciplines. Three faculty participants received TEAM STEPPS training and certification in this area.
  • F/T nursing faculty are being enrolled into the BlackBoard Organization for CUNY Nursing Best Practices, a site developed as a repository for evidenced-based resources, teaching strategies and tools to promote excellence in nursing education.
  • The Leadership Institute in Nursing Education initiative was launched in June. This is a year-long program targeting junior faculty who were selected through a competitive process. Participants attended a series of workshops in June and were assigned a nurse faculty mentor to assist them in implementing an individualized faculty development project.

Plans and timeline:

The online faculty survey will continue to inform a series of new faculty development activities in 2013-14.  Ongoing activities will include webinars through the purchased subscription, increased use of the Best Practices in Nursing Education Blackboard site, and implementation of faculty development projects by junior faculty who are participating in the Leadership Institute in Nursing Education.

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Goal #1.7:  Enhance SEEK/CD student academic performance outcomes

Team leader: Williams

Team members: Ast, Kingston (directors, counselors, academic support coordinators)

Summary:

This team has worked to establish SEEK/CD Program Assessment Committee; establish baseline student performance on selected measures; identify and implement best practices for universal adoption; and develop learning outcomes for each practice.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The Assessment Committee met regularly during the spring semester. Their most significant accomplishment was to identify key performance indicators— SEEK student outcomes in freshman composition and gateway mathematics (for the PMP), completion of basic skills at the comprehensive and community colleges, and GPA for all freshman, transfers and continuing students. Additionally, the committee refined the SEEK and CD Performance Goals and Objectives which are modeled on the University PMP and developed in the OSP. The Goals and Objectives were vetted in a meeting of SEEK/CD professionals
  • The OSP and Assessment Committee determined that future comparison tables generated by OSP will eliminate Macaulay student data as they, like Special Programs students, are admitted based on different criteria than “regular.” Including Macaulay students in the “regular” population skews the student performance outcomes.
  • The OSP produced the Fall 2012 performance data for SEEK and CD students. A notable student outcome is that the required pre-freshman summer programs are continuing to have the desired impact on the first semester performance of these at risk students who don’t meet the admissions criteria set by their respective colleges. The percentage of incoming SEEK new freshman earning GPAs of 2.0 or higher was equal to or higher than for regulars at seven of the 11 senior colleges. At Baruch the percentage of SEEK new freshmen earning GPAs of 3.5 or higher was greater than for better prepared “regular” admits. Performance among SEEK transfers reflects the efforts of the CD to SEEK Passport initiative. A higher percentage of transferring SEEK students earned GPAs of 2.0 or higher at seven colleges, significantly higher at Baruch, Brooklyn, Lehman, Medgar Evers, and NYCCT, where the differences averaged higher 5 percentage points or higher. One-year retention rates for the Fall 2011 SEEK cohort exceeded those of regulars for the first time in at least seven years. SEEK four-year graduation rates increased by nearly three percentage points (2.9) over the previous year, thus continuing to narrow the gap between SEEK and regular graduation rates. 
  • Baruch SEEK was recognized for outstanding program performance, winning the prestigious NASPA Gold Award, conferred at the organization’s national conference.

Plans and timeline:

In AY2013-2014 a major assessment initiative will secure a database of SEEK and CD students. Data will be imported from the campus programs and the IRDB, enabling OSP to better assess initiatives’ impacts and use of support services. The OSP will assist colleges in securing programs if they are not currently tracking students’ use of services use electronically.

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Goal #1.8: Increase Online and Hybrid Courses in CUNY

Team leader: Otte    

Team members: Mogulescu, Zoe

Summary:

This team has worked to ensure that there is an appropriate and accurate metric for measuring the percentage of instructional (student) FTEs offered partially or totally online; extend the University-wide training workshops for online and hybrid instructors; oversee and follow up on the Hybrid Initiative; foster the offering of more online courses and online degrees; and create and launch an online general education core curriculum.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • New University standards for coding online and hybrid courses have been helpful but insufficient in gauging their enrollments because of reporting problems at the colleges; refinements in the PMP process should improve both the accuracy of reporting and impetus for offering such courses.
  • Summer, fall, intersession and spring workshops for online/hybrid instructors had over 200 participants from 17 campuses, and followed a new process for payment of participants designed to increase campus incentives for follow-through.
  • All six campuses participating in the third wave of the CUNY Hybrid Initiative have filed reports this summer indicating they met or exceeded their targets. The Hybrid Initiative website, designed to disseminate information about the results of the initiative and its effective practices, was launched at the CUNY IT Conference in November 2012; it was also featured in a presentation at the national Blended Learning Conference in Milwaukee this July.
  • Two new online degree programs (a BA in Disability Studies and an MS in Data Analytics) were successfully launched at the CUNY School of Professional Studies this fall; the CUNY Board of Trustees and the New York State Education Department approved SPS’s proposal for an online Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree program.
  • A revision of SPS’s online general education curriculum under the Pathways Initiative has gone through all the stages of approval and course site preparation, making a suite of fully online general education courses available, not just to online degree students at SPS, but prospectively to all CUNY undergraduates.

Plans and timeline:

  • Established projects (the Hybrid Initiative website, workshops for online/hybrid instructions, dissemination of both online and hybrid instruction) will continue.
  • Recommendations are being developed for significant changes in the e-Permit system which should facilitate access to and enrollment in online gen ed offerings.
  • The online Nursing degree will be launched in Spring 2014. A new online bachelor’s degree (a BS in Information Systems) has successfully circulated a letter of intent and a proposal is in development for a planned launch in Fall 2014.

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Goal #1.9: Improve and enhance quality of teacher preparation programs and align these programs with current national professional goals and standards.

Team leader: Lucariello;

Team members: Alvarado-Santos, Crook, Sloan

Summary:

Enhance clinically-rich teacher preparation. Integrate Common Core State Standards (CCSS)  into our teacher prep programs. Enhance and increase CUNY partnership relations related to teacher preparation to improve teacher preparation.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Data Initiative. One major effort has been to collect data on the effectiveness of our graduates, as most Schools of Education do not already have these data. CUNY has been working with the NYCDOE, over the past two years, to get data on its graduates, from ’05 onward, (and on non-CUNY grads), working in NYCDOE schools. CUNY now has a data file with data for over 22,000 graduates (of over 32,000), who match with NYCDOE records, from 7 academic years beginning ‘04-‘05. The file will be updated annually. These data files have employment location and contact information and key performance indicators, including retention, value-added scores, and tenure status.
  • Professional Development Initiative - CUNY received $3.5 million, over 2 yrs, from the NYS Education Dept for faculty professional development to enhance preparation of effective teachers-leaders by making preparation more clinically-rich and integrative of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). My office held five campus-wide events for faculty this past academic year which provided them greater familiarity with performance-based assessments and the Common Core State Standards. Through a sub-MOU with NYCDOE, faculty are also receiving enhanced clinical experience. NYS Ed Dept and NYCDOE have been very involved in planning and participating in these conferences. Chancellor Tisch launched the initiative. Campus-based teams are engaged in curriculum redesign.
  • NYC Teaching Fellows Contract. CUNY submitted its proposal for a new contract and the proposal was accepted. The contract is presently being negotiated. CUNY will continue to have Fellows.
  • Enhancing Partnership Relations:
    • An exclusive partnership between CUNY and Math for America (MfA) in NYC has been formed. The second cohort of Master’s degree Fellows has been admitted at CCNY.
    • CUNY’s long-standing (12yrs.+) Partnership with Lincoln Center Institute (LCI) has been refocused on evidence-based research on the impacts of LCI experiences on our teacher candidates. Faculty participated in research seminars last year and conducted a pilot study. This year they were engaged in the full research, which will continue.
Plans and timeline:

All activities continue going forward. CUNY now has all current data from the DOE and will be able to conduct data analysis this year.


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Goal #2.1: In keeping with the framework of the Decade of Science, enhance research commercialization and economic development

Team leader: Small

Team members: Adams, Blaho, Dagan

Summary: This team works to increase tech transfer efforts and support faculty in areas of entrepreneurship and in forming and gaining support for new start-up companies.

Progress toward success indicators

  • Coordinating efforts of the Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) and CUNY CAT (Center for Advanced Technology) to increase collaborations with industry, license CUNY intellectual property, and educate faculty regarding start-up companies and applying for SBIR/STTR grants.  The New York City Economic Development Corporation-funded SBIR training was held at the CUNY Graduate Center on January 23, 2013.   
  • Nine license and/or option agreements have been signed, including an option agreement to Urban Electric Power, a CUNY spin-off company, for a battery storage technology.  Three issued United States patents.  Three inventors are working with experienced, outside entrepreneurs to write business plans and position their technology to venture capitalists.  
  • Received $3.74 million NSF I-Corps entrepreneurship training grant and launched the New York City Regional Innovation Node.
  • Since July 2012, organized five entrepreneurial faculty/student I-Corps and each were awarded a $50,000 grant from the NSF to receive intensive entrepreneurial training.
  • The CUNY CAT has partnered with the NYC regional technology development center, ITAC, to offer SBIR 101 lectures at CUNY campuses.
  • At its June 2012 meeting the CUNY Board of Trustees approved leasing space 215 W 125th street in Manhattan for the new CUNY Hub for Innovation & Entrepreneurship. The agreement has been signed by CUNY and the landlord and has been sent to NY State Comptroller and Attorney General for final approval. 
  • An Advisory Committee for the Hub has been established involving faculty members from several CUNY colleges including Baruch, CSI, CCNY, Brooklyn, Hunter, Queens, and LaGuardia CC. The Committee met in January 2013 to review plans for the Hub and consider general policies and procedure for its management.
  • A preliminary license agreement has been developed by the Office of the General Counsel for the Hub occupants.
  • A preliminary handbook of policies and procedures has been developed for the Hub.
  • A plan has been developed with the Field Center for Entrepreneurship at Baruch College to provide professional support services for Hub occupants.

Plans and timeline:

In the upcoming year we will be rolling out the CUNY Hub for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and will need to cultivate CUNY alumni and angel investors for Hub start-up companies and implement robust professional support services for Hub occupants.  The Technology Commercialization Office plans to form a network of angel investors looking to invest in early stage technologies.

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Goal #2.2: Create mechanisms to support increased inter-campus research collaborations

Team leaders: Small

Team members: Caplan, Maclachlan

Summary:

This team seeks to increase the submission of collaborative, cross-campus external grant applications.  The success indicators include increased submission of collaborative cross-campus external grant proposals.

 

Progress toward Success Indicators

  • We held a grant-writing workshop entitled A One-Day Workshop in Pedagogical Research Design on January 14, 2013 at the Borough of Manhattan Community College. This workshop focused on experimental design for community college faculty involved in research into high-impact practices as well as more discipline-based endeavors.
  • We hosted a Nanoscience Workshop for senior college faculty in the fall of 2012.  This was the fourth in a series of University-wide workshops addressing disciplines linked to the founding of the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC).  The one-day events function as a showcase for nanoscience research at CUNY with short talks given by faculty, and a poster session for students and postdocs.
  • We promote on an ongoing basis our internal funding programs that encourage and support cross-campus collaborative research: the CUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant and the Community College Collaborative Incentive Research Grant. Both programs have been changed to an online submission process for the current year.
  • We have been directly involved in promoting collaborations between colleges for submission of large institutional grants from the NSF and NIH including STEP, BUILD and TUES type 2 proposals.
 

Plans and timeline:

We promote on an ongoing basis our internal funding programs that encourage and support cross-campus collaborative research: the CUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant and the Community College Collaborative Incentive Research Grant.

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Goal #2.3: Enhance research, including by graduate students and undergraduates

Team leaders: Small

Team members: Caplan, Maclachlan

Summary:

This team works to increase the number of relevant grant applications and publications, focuses on faculty research fellowships, sponsors research conferences, and concentrates on improved IRB and dissertation proposals (graduate students).

Progress toward success indicators:

  • We continue to carry out or sponsor grant-writing seminar/workshops at the campuses.  The seminars were focused on preparing a proposal for specific federal agencies (NIH, NSF).
  • The CUNY summer undergraduate research program (C-SURP) is taking place June – August 2013.
  • We held the fourth annual Nobel Science Challenge to CUNY undergraduates and the winners were announced at an award ceremony on February 2013.
  • We have created a CUNY-wide website to coordinate all undergraduate research activities across the University.  This website has an inventory of all institutional grants that fund undergraduate research as well as a searchable database for students to find undergraduate research opportunities.
 

Plans and timeline:

We are planning a workshop in the fall of 2013 on institutionalizing undergraduate research at the university and integrating research into the undergraduate curriculum.

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Goal # 2.4: In keeping with the framework of the Decade of Science, take next steps on ASRC

Team leader: Small

Team member: d’Ambrosio (Development, Facilities)

Summary:

This team continues to plan for the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC).

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Projected completion date is on schedule for Fall, 2014. We are identifying equipment items to be included in the building and reviewing proposals from vendors, finalizing selections of furniture and finishes, and restarting discussions about the Discovery and Education Center.
  • An advanced science seminar series continued through the year. With the input of the ASRC Advisory Committee, distinguished scientists in each of the ASRC science areas were identified and several invited to give talks. The speakers spend a day with CUNY faculty and students and give a talk in the afternoon. There is approximately one seminar each month.  
  • Follow-up discussions occurred with several promising candidates to head three of the four open flagship areas.
  • An external Advisory Board provided guidance with planning and recruiting. And the internal Advisory Committee was instrumental is offering advice on appropriate instrumentation for the Center.
  • Fundraising efforts are ongoing. A Case for Support was completed. Several strategic meetings were held including site visits.
  • Finalists for the Clean Room Manager position have been identified.
  •  A Strategic Plan was completed as well as several marketing/branding tools

Plans and timeline:

Projected completion date is on schedule for Fall 2014. The plan is to continue in this year to pursue fundraising goals, continue to recruit top level researchers for the ASRC and implement the strategic plan.

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Goal #2.5: Strengthen research compliance oversight & support

Team leader: Small

Team member: Lada

Summary:

This team has worked to enhance CUNY’s policies and procedures concerning multiple areas of research compliance.

Progress toward success indicators:

Human Research Protection Program (HRPP)

  • Established procedures for supporting the New Community College’s HRPP needs
  • Developed and implemented new and revised HRPP policies and procedures, including policies and procedures to address allegations of non-compliance
  • Updated HRPP forms for researchers and checklists for reviewers for consistency with new policies
  • Conducted training for program directors at School of Professional Studies
  • Performed system evaluation of the IRBNet system, and started the process of addressing concerns related to its effectiveness
  • Established relationships with local administration at various colleges to ensure appropriate and adequate collaborative oversight of the college specific HRPP offices

Export control plan

  • Held the first training session for Export Control Administrators from across CUNY
  • Implemented ITAR inventory and shipping evaluations across all colleges

Responsible Conduct of Research

  • Held our annual training for postdoctoral scholars and graduate students at The Graduate Center in Spring
  • Drafted a revised research misconduct policy for review by Legal Counsel

Conflict of Interest

  • Established CUNY’s first College Conflicts Committee; held a training session for the Committee members; and the Conflicts Committee held its first meeting this Spring.

Plans and timeline:

Over the coming year, continue to work on implementing new policies and procedures, continue to educate the research community and continue to perform the evaluations that result in process improvements.


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Goal #2.6: Faculty professional development in connection with NYS Regents Reform Agenda (teacher education). Supported by $3.5 million from NYS from now to 9/2014.

Team leader: Lucariello

Team members: Aylesworth, Maruca

Summary:

This team works to develop and promote university faculty (Education School sand Arts & Sciences) professional development on enhanced clinical skills, data-driven instruction, and college readiness. Also implement activities related to MOU with NYS Education Department.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • CUNY-wide Professional Development Conferences – five were held this year. Some were designed to enhance clinical preparation by providing faculty with greater familiarity with performance-based assessments and the use of data to drive instruction. Others focused on knowledge of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).
  • Systemic curricular re-design of teacher and leader preparation programs to be accomplished through campus based teams of university and K-12 faculty. Teams worked this year to align curriculum with the new state certification exams, enhance the clinical experience, and integrate the CCSS.
  • Collaboration with NYCDOE to enhance faculty clinical skills and bridge the pre- and in-service experience of our candidates through:
  1. a.      DOE training on performance-based assessment. CUNY field supervisors are participating in the NYCDOE’s program that trains principals and assistant principals to observe, evaluate, and provide effective feedback to, in-service teachers on their practice.
  2. b.     DOE provided video library of teaching practices as a faculty resource
  3. c.     DOE workshops on the pupil data system in use in NYC schools and on how in-service teachers and leaders use data to drive differentiated instruction to achieve pupil learning.


Plans and timeline:

In the coming year, all these activities will continue. In addition, support and guidance for our first-year teachers (Teacher Induction) will be provided. This work is supported by $3.5 million from New York State until September 2014.

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Goal #3.1:  Improve SEEK/CD academic support and counseling service delivery 

Team leader: Williams

Team members: Ast, Kingston, Sanchez

Summary:

Finalize revision of SEEK Guidelines. Pilot Retain early alert system and configure applications to support SEEK/CD initiatives; assess effectiveness. Promulgate new Special Programs transfer policy.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Progress towards finalizing revisions to the SEEK Guidelines has been extremely slow. Limited staffing in the OSP and the administrative demands of two additional University programs has necessitated a reordering of priorities. During the past academic year two drafts of the document were completed. The first was written by the SEEK Directors who focused on updating the current Guidelines to reflect changing campus practices. The OSP reviewed the document and returned it to the Council for additional revisions which were completed.
  • The logistics of piloting Hobson’s Retain are such that the goal was revised to coordinate with the Early Alert efforts of the Office of Student Affairs. In subsequent discussions, we determined that the most efficient way to operate the project would be at the campus level, selecting the colleges with the most experience using Retain and with the most robust applications. Baruch and Hunter have been identified, and the SEEK programs at both campuses have begun discussions with their college’s “Super Users” to establish an early alert protocol for students taking freshman composition and the respective gateway math courses. 
  • The Transfer Working Group revised the Special Programs Transfer Form and presented it to the SEEK/CD EM Committee which made revisions and suggestions for making better use of CUNYFirst technology

Plans and timeline:

  • Work on the SEEK Guidelines will continue. The target completion date has been extended to fall 2013.
  • Once the work on the SEEK Guidelines has been completed, work will begin on revising the College Discovery Guidelines. The task should be completed by spring 2014.
  • The OSP will monitor and support the Retain early alert programs at Hunter and Baruch and expand the project to other SEEK and CD programs as their colleges secure Retain. We will review the fall 2013 performance data to determine the impact on freshman composition and gateway math outcomes.
The Transfer Working Group will submit a final version of the Special Programs Transfer Form and present it to the SEEK/CD EM Committee in fall 2013.

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Goal #3.2: Increase student success in math

Team leader:  Logue

Team members: Crook, Kendrick, Lucariello, Watanabe

Summary:

Although the data continue to show a steady increase in the pass rates in mathematics gateway courses, progress is slow.  We are working with the math faculty to make some additional policy changes, and we are continuing to scale up successful pedagogical techniques that can help to improve mathematics performance.  Mathematics continues to be the biggest challenge to our students’ success.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • An additional faculty member received the Chancellor’s award for instruction in math this spring.
  • We continue to distribute the results of the funded math research projects.
  • The CUNY math blog is increasing in use and this spring had its 50th blog entry and its first anniversary.
  • At the request of the Math Discipline Council, we are planning a 2014 Math instruction conference.
  • At their request, we have provided the Math chairs with information helpful in assessing Math adjunct performance.
  • The new CUNY-wide elementary algebra exam was implemented for the first time last fall and the first indications are that students are now passing elementary algebra at higher rates than under the previous course system.
  • The Math Discipline Council established a subcommittee on remediation that has recommended several policy changes.
  • The central office is considering making these changes as well as other changes related to assessment of math proficiency across the university.
  • Projects listed elsewhere (e.g., 1.1 on ASAP, 1.2 on Graduate NYC!, 1.3 on CUNY Start, 4.3 on Implementation of College Focus, and 4.5 on the Math Remediation Experiment) are also directed at significantly improving students’ mathematics performance.

Plans and timeline:

  • We will continue to work in close partnership with the Math Discipline Council.
  • This summer we will reinforce existing, and release some additional, policies related to math proficiency and remediation.
Next fall and going forward, we will continue to expand programs that have been demonstrated to increase students’ success in math.

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Goal #3.3: Develop guidelines for assessing general education outcomes

Team leader: Wilks/Zoe

Team members: CUE Committee, CUNY Assessment Council

Summary:

In extensive consultation with the campuses, draft CUNY-wide general guidelines for assessing the learning outcomes established for the 30-credit common core. Adopt University-wide, general guidelines.

Progress toward indicators:

  • Reviewed existing general education assessment strategies at the campuses.
  • Identified external assessment models and tools for review.
  • Met with CUNY Assessment Council to solicit recommendations.
  • Identified broad interest in designing Common Core area rubrics for optional use by the campuses.
  • Reviewed campus rubrics currently in use across the campuses and engaged in cross-campus discussion to solicit ideas regarding fundamental principles, definition of guidelines, the process and strategies for moving forward.
  • Convened a Common Core Assessment Team (CAT) to prepare first draft of General Guidelines.

Plans and timeline:

The Core Assessment Team (Zoe, Croke, HC, JJ, LGA, 2 CUE Directors, 2 Assessment Council) will work throughout the summer to prepare a first draft of General Guidelines and a proposed process by September 2013 to share with the CUE Committee and Assessment Council. With input, suggestions and revisions from both groups, a final draft will be prepared to share with Central OAA by December 2014.

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Goal # 3.4: Improve accountability of CUE-funded Academic Support Services

Team leader: Wilks/Zoe

Team members: Wrigley, Maruca, CUE Committee, Immersion Coordinators

Summary:

Refine CUE funding model and reporting system to support programs with demonstrated effectiveness in improving student success.  Implement evaluation strategies for key CUE-funded programs.

Progress toward indicators:

  • Identified OAA priorities for CUE funding: immersion programs (including bridge programs at the senior colleges), first-year programs (including for native and transfer students) and academic support services (including but not limited to supplemental instruction, tutoring, and advisement).
  • Communicated change in CUE funding strategy to CAOs and CUE Committee.
  • Campuses submitted draft goals December 1 and finalized goals by January 15.
  • Development of new reporting requirements, including a revised year-end report template and a new budget template, with review and input from CUE Committee.
  • New performance-based funding formula for FY14 was developed (with assistance of Wrigley and Maruca), shared with CUE Directors for comment and  input and communicated to CAOs and CUE Committee in May 2013.
  • CUE year-end report deadline moved to July 15th to allow for assessment of college goals to determine performance based portion of 2013/14 allocation.
  • College CUE goals for 2013/14 by priority area are now included in year-end report tp guide and inform use of allocation.

Plans and timeline:

During 2013/2014:

  • Evaluate impact of new funding model and the use of targeted goals to achieve desired outcomes.
  • Examine strategies to develop meaningful indicators upon which to base future CUE funding, particularly given the complexities of evaluating the impact of academic support services on learning outcomes.
  • Continue to streamline reporting tools and process to allow for greater accountability and less routine reporting that is not tied to specific goals and outcomes.

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Goal #3.5: Pilot Seminars Bridging the Gap between Cognitive Research and Pedagogy

Team leader: Wilks/Wach

Team members: (CTL Directors)

Summary :

Conduct similar faculty development seminars across several campuses that explore key aspects of learning, the research that supports them and implications for instructional practice. “Bridging the Gap” Seminars are being offered on six campuses: Kingsborough, Lehman, Hostos, York, City Tech and LaGuardia. A common text (How Learning Works, Ambrose, et. al., 2010) is being used across the six seminars. Thematic areas under examination are: the role of prior knowledge, deep vs. surface learning, and the role of practice and feedback.

Progress toward success indicators :

  • 84 faculty have participated in seminars across the six campuses;
  • Pre- and post-seminar survey data, using commonly adopted instruments, have been collected on each campus;
  • Classroom application of strategies developed in the seminars were implemented in Spring 2013 semester;
  • Digital platforms for use and dissemination of seminar materials set up at Kingsborough, City Tech, and York;
  • Dissemination of seminar activities at 2013 CUE Conference (York, Hostos, Lehman)
  • Plans developed for continuing seminar activity in 2013-2014.
 

Plans and timeline :

  • Collect, collate, and analyze survey data (Fall 2013);
  • Collect, collate, and analyze seminar-derived materials developed and applied in classrooms (Fall 2013);
  • Plan a cross-campus forum for seminar participants (Fall 2013);
  • Expand seminars to additional campuses (Fall 2013);
  • Develop evaluation plan for measuring seminar impact on faculty practice and student learning (Fall 2013-Spring 2014);
Explore new seminar possibilities (Fall 2013-Spring 2014).

 

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Goal #3.6: Increase Student Success in Reading and Writing

Team leader: Wilks/Crook

Team members: Cooper-Shpirt, Croke, Depovic, Leece, Moy, Oppenheim, Rubin

Summary:

The OAA Reading Group met with groups of faculty at the associate-degree-granting campuses to evaluate the effectiveness of CUNY’s approach to developmental reading, with particular attention to curricular and pedagogical models, and the adequacy of the current basic reading assessment to gauge readiness for reading tasks required in introductory and general education courses.   

Progress toward indicators:

  • Reviewed system-level data on developmental reading outcomes, and relevant reports and research.
  • Catalogued CUNY remedial curriculum/ course sequences.
  • Met with groups of reading faculty at all six community colleges (64 faculty participated).
  • Initiated review/ discussion of alternatives to current reading assessment.
  • Met with external experts.
  • Met with Reading Discipline Council to review and prioritize preliminary recommendations.
  • Submitted OAA Reading Group Report to EVC Logue for review and action.
  • Established a CUNY Reading Panel to draft a common set of learning objectives for developmental reading and to make recommendations for assessing them on exit from the top-level course. 
  • The panel developed a set of common learning objectives taking into account input from the Reading Discipline Council and the New York State Education Department’s Common Core standards. 
  • Panel met 12 times in the spring of 2013 and prepared a memorandum with recommendations for the Executive Vice Chancellor.

Plans and timeline:

In the fall of 2013, OAA will disseminate the assessment the learning objectives and assessment policies endorsed by the Executive Vice Chancellor, with a timeline for implementation to follow.

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Goal #4.1: Increase Participation in Summer and Winter Immersion

Team leader: Wilks (now Zoe)

Team members: Ko, Bauer, Croke, Wrigley, Immersion Directors, OIRA

Summary:

The OAA Working Group and the Immersion Directors are analyzing immersion enrollment and completion data, the effectiveness of immersion programs in supporting students’ exit from remediation, immersion program models, and the capacity for immersion to expand by individual campus. Additional funds were made available from the Central Office to increase summer immersion program enrollment on the campuses. Priorities were for initiatives and programs that will increase the number of students who have access to and enroll in immersion programs. Colleges could request up to $75,000 to increase immersion through the summer 2013. Eleven colleges submitted proposals for summer immersion expansion and were funded for a total amount of $621,000.

Progress toward indicators:

  • Completed winter 2011 and summer 2011 data collection; drafted summer 2011 analysis (need fall 2012 enrollment data to complete longitudinal analysis).
  • Total enrollment in summer immersion increased from 13,260 in 2009 to 15,596 in 2010 to 17,575 in 2011; some campuses have significantly increased enrollment over this period; other campuses have remained flat or declined.
  • Determined pass rates on exit from remediation in immersion (vs. completion rates not always linked to exit assessment) .
  • Initiated summer 2012 data collection and analysis; process delayed because of staffing issues .
  • Collected reports on OAA funding to expand 2012 summer immersion programs; analysis demonstrated that most campuses met their goals of increasing by 10 percent.
  • Identified immersion as one of three OAA priorities for CUE funding.
  • Invited Paul Attewell and his team to present their findings to the Immersion Directors and the CUE Directors during the spring 2013 semester.
  • Distributed an additional $621,000 in support of summer immersion expansion.

Plans and timeline:

  • Complete winter 2012 and summer 2012 immersion analysis by September 30.
  • Initiate and complete winter 2013 and summer 2013 immersion analysis by January 31.
  • Discuss evaluation findings with immersion directors to inform planning for winter 2014 and summer 2014 immersion .
  • Conduct analysis of data on models and outcomes to identify most effective instruction models for immersion.
Begin exploration of a predictive model examining policy and pedagogical practices that foster greater and more stable exits from remediation .

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Goal #4.2: Establish CUNY-wide Policy on Immediate and Continuous Remediation

Team leader: Wrigley

Team members: Croke, Crook, Ptachik,Wilks, and Zoe.


Summary:

Develop policies to foster students’ immediate and continuous remediation until proficiency is reached

Recommendations developed by the group:         

  • Students should be encouraged to take their proficiency exams as soon as possible after they receive notification of admission.
  • CUNY colleges should actively advertise summer immersion programs to students entering in the fall.
  • Students with one remedial need should be required address it immediately on entry into CUNY, or preferably, before. Colleges with high numbers of equated credits in remedial courses should consider reducing the number to make it easier for students to address two remedial needs in a semester.
  • Colleges should strongly encourage, or require, students with three remedial needs, or with deep remedial needs and/or multiple needs such that three or more developmental classes would be needed, to attend CUNY Start as a condition of entering the University.
  • Winter immersion should be strongly encouraged for “near passes,” students who did reasonably well in a developmental course but did not pass the exit exam. Colleges should also develop modules and other short-term interventions. Students who score just below cutoff points should have opportunities to take gateway courses with support.
  • Students who fail remedial courses should be provided advisement and academic support to help them immediately retake the failed course.
  • CUNY should encourage the development of alternative approaches in math, such as Quantway or Statway, that could help reduce failure rates while also providing skills likely to be of particular use to students entering non-STEM fields.
  • CUNY should work with the DOE to expand proficiency testing in high school and to offer courses geared to developing proficiency.

Plans and timeline:

On June 27, 2013, EVC Logue sent a message to CUNY CAOs and others updating CUNY’s remedial policy and practice, with some key recommendations from the Working Group included.

 

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Goal #4.3: Implementation of College Focus

Team leader: Hofmann

Team members: Conrad, Crook, Lucariello, Wrigley

Summary:

Pilot a program to help high school students who are not “college-ready” gain academic proficiency before graduation, with a summer program for rising seniors and an academic-year program for seniors. Provide College Now courses from the CUNY Common Core for students who are determined to be college ready if they complete College Focus successfully


Progress toward success indicators:

  • A five-week, half-day summer program was implemented for rising twelfth graders who would likely need remediation but were on-track to graduate. The summer pilot served 123 rising seniors (from 36 high schools) at LaGuardia and Hostos; students took either a math course or literacy course and participated in college success workshops.
  • Overall, 70 students (67.3% of those who tested) passed out of at least one remedial area; 19 students (18.1%) became fully skills proficient through a combination of their CAT performance and Regents scores.
  • 87 students applied to CUNY through the first 3 phases: 36 were admitted to their first choice college; 19 participants were admitted to their second choice.
  • College Now staff visited the summer programs and presented their course offerings.  We will report on College Now outcomes when spring data are finalized this summer. 
  • A College Focus pilot program in the spring served 240 high school seniors (from 12 high schools) in the Queens and Staten Island.  The majority of these students were CUNY applicants and were pre-tested on CUNY Assessment Tests before participating in the program.  Students took a math or literacy course before or after school, and College Now administrators from Queensborough, LaGuardia, CSI and Kingsborough supported the program, which ran at a mix of large, comprehensive high schools that are significant CUNY feeders and several smaller high schools.

Plans and timeline:

The 2013 summer program will begin in July at Hostos, LaGuardia, Queensborough and Kingsborough, with a target enrollment of 350 students.  Based on feedback from the 2012 pilot, this year’s five-week summer program will be full day.  Collaborative Programs and College Now staff are working with these campuses plus CSI, Bronx and Guttman Community College to implement a program that will reach an additional 350 students in the 2013-14 school year. College Now program staff will present on opportunities to take Pathways courses for all summer and fall program participants.

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Goal #4.4:Employ High School Grades for Remediation Placement

Team leader: Crook

Team members: Moy, Truelsch, Uber

Summary:

Determine the feasibility of using high school grades, in addition to COMPASS test scores, for placing students into or out of remediation. Execute pilot test of new placement algorithm and observe improved placement accuracy (increased student success).

Progress toward success indicators:

This work was inspired by research conducted by Judith Scott-Clayton, of the Community College Research Center, who correlated COMPASS test scores with grades in entry-level credit courses at CUNY, and found that significant numbers of students are being placed into remedial course work who could probably have succeeded if they had been placed directly into credit courses instead. Our goal was to refine her analyses and determine whether CUNY students could benefit if the University were to take into account additional information in placing them. To this end, we gathered lists of credit courses from each associate-granting CUNY college (Scott-Clayton had relied on overly narrow lists of courses). We focused on math courses such as quantitative reasoning, statistics and college algebra, as well as freshman composition and those requiring a substantial amount of reading. Performance in these courses will determine whether or not a student is college ready. We consulted with Scott-Clayton to confirm aspects of her methodology. Finally we constructed and tested a set of alternative indexes comprising COMPASS and various combinations of high school information. For mathematics,the best-performing index, and one that could save CUNY money, consisted of high school math grades and the amount of college preparatory work completed. Note that this index would not rely on COMPASS. Using this index, we could maintain current success rates in credit math courses while placing fewer students into remedial instruction.

Plans and timeline:

In the summer of 2013, we will refine the math index to ascertain its stability using data from more than a single cohort, exploring ways to handle missing data, and consider additional covariates. At the same time we will develop indexes to place students into or out of remedial instruction in reading and writing. In fall 2013, we will explore with CIS and the testing coordinators the technical and logistical feasibility of implementing indexes for placing students and consider whether to launch a pilot.


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Goal #4.5: Conduct math remediation experiment (Spencer grant)

Team leader: Logue

Team members: Kapp, Maruca, Watanabe

Summary

We are on track to conduct this experiment in fall 2013.

Progress towards success indicators:

  • The pilot at BMCC and LCC was successfully completed last fall.
  • Many lessons were learned from the pilot regarding how to conduct this randomized assignment, controlled, experiment.  The pilot presented many challenges, particularly because of course scheduling difficulties and because campus communication with students is not always consistent or transparent.
  • The pilot data indicate that many students assessed as needing math remediation can successfully pass a credit-bearing math course (introductory statistics) with extra support (a weekly workshop).
  • The data may indicate that students are more likely to be incorrectly assessed as remedial at one of the two pilot colleges, thus increasing the percentage that pass the statistics course at that college.
  • The experiment’s advisory board has provided many excellent, useful comments on how to conduct this experiment.
  • The full experiment will be conducted at BMCC, LCC, and HCC in fall 2013.
  • The campus liaisons for the full experiment are now working.
  • The graduate research assistants for the full experiment are now working.
  • The selection of the peer workshop leaders for the full experiment is in progress.
  • Recruitment of students for the full experiment is in progress.
  • All IRB approvals have been obtained.

Plans and timeline:

  • Summer 2013: Complete selection and training of peer workshop leaders.
  • Summer 2013: Complete recruitment of students.
  • Fall 2013: Conduct full experiment.
  • Spring 2014: Analyze data from full experiment.

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Goal #4.6: Student Success Research and Development Fund

Team leader: Maruca

Team members: Crook, Chellman, Littman, Lucariello, Wilks, Wrigley, Zoe

Summary:

This team’s goal was to provide support and funding for research and evaluation of promising innovations at CUNY designed to improve students’ prospects for baccalaureate or associate degree attainment and to encourage the adoption of innovations that prove effective.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Created a two-stage RFP to solicit research proposals for the evaluation of promising practices to encourage student success.
  • Awarded a total of $692,000 to five colleges to research and evaluate promising practices to promote student success. The following research programs were funded:
  • An evaluation of “Early Start” (i.e. summer-into-fall courses) program strategies at John Jay College
  • An evaluation of team-based learning in large classrooms at Brooklyn College
  • An evaluation of peer-led learning communities in STEM disciplines at City College
  • An evaluation of the Bronx Community College First Year Seminar
  • An evaluation of the “Student Support Network,” an early alert system at Queensborough Community College
    • Worked with all of the research teams on methodological and implementation issues and ensured initiation of each research program.
    • Distributed a second two-stage RFP to fund a second set of research projects in fiscal year 2014

Plans and timeline:

  • Receive regular progress reports on the five funded research programs throughout the year and ensure completion by the end of academic year 2014.
  • Receive and analyze the research results by summer 2014.
  • Disseminate the research finding throughout CUNY, assess relevance for other colleges, and develop plans to act on the findings as appropriate during the summer of 2014.
  • Fund between two and five new student success research programs in Fall 2013.
Renew the research, dissemination, and action cycle for the next set of research projects.

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Goals #4.7 and # 4.8: Implement Retain early alert system to identify students early in the semester who are at risk for failure. Establish early contact call center(s). Identify special population of at-risk students to receive early contact calls.

Team leader: Sanchez

Team members: Alvarez, Beck, Crook, Dalpes, DiTommaso, Williams

Summary:

During the fall of 2013, a pilot of Retain’s Early Alert function will be launched on at least one campus. Call centers will provide early contact to select student populations. (Please note: this goal has been revised since the original writing of the OAA goals to combine early alert and early contact plans.)

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Twelve colleges are in different stages of implementation of Retain.
  • Hunter, LaGuardia, Baruch and Guttman are actively using Retain to communicate with students. 
  • Establishing expectations of Student Success: Early Alert
    • SEEK/CD planning early alert pilot with four colleges (Baruch, Hunter, LaGuardia and Hostos). Planning has begun with Baruch..
    • Baruch will be implementing its Retain Early Alert system for fall 2013; presented their Early Alert system at OAS’s Super Users group
    • Hunter piloting Retain’s early alert module.
    • Many schools are using some form of Early Alert though not with Retain.
  • Retain’s Early Alert and Veterans
    • Formation of Hobsons Connect and Retain working group to  identify and implement more seamless ways to better serve student veterans.
  • Call Center Pilot Projects for select populations:
    • Veterans – P.R.O.V.E. (CUNY Social Work students)
    • Communities of Care/Crear Futoros  (mentors)

Plans and timeline:

  • Early Alert
    • Implement SEEK/CD Early Alert pilot at four colleges - ongoing 2013-14
    • Presentations to Chief Student Affairs Officers – fall 2013
    • Outreach to Provosts re: use of Retain’s Early Alert function – fall 2013
    • Pilot Early Alert with student veterans at selected colleges - ongoing 2013-14
    • First-year Experience Conference (proposed) to feature Retain’s Early Alert function – spring 2013
    • Continue to work with Super Users group – ongoing 2013-14
  • Call Centers
    • Continue work with P.R.O.V.E. and Crear Futoros – ongoing 2013-14
Identify programs for select populations, especially those programs using peer mentors – fall 2013

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Goal #5.1: Begin to increase retention of CUNY graduates in the teaching profession in NYC high-need schools

Team leader: Lucariello

Team members: Alvarado-Santos, Chellman, Crook, Sloan


Summary:

This team works to analyze teacher performance data (obtained from NYCDOE) on CUNY graduates and engage in program revisions based on results. Also works to enhance teacher preparation related to clinical skills.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Data Initiative. As explained in Goal #1.9.
  • Program analysis and revision will be done on the retention data for which CUNY preparation programs lead to greater retention. We will seek to replicate those programs and features.
    • Improve clinical preparation of our candidates by providing faculty professional development related to their role as clinical trainers and by transforming the curriculum. Candidates with stronger clinical skills are more likely to stay longer in the classroom. Funds from the MOU with NYSED on faculty professional development are helping to support this effort. My office has held several cross-campus conferences to provide faculty experiences to enhance their role as clinical mentors. Campus-based teams are revising the curriculum to enhance the clinical experience.
    • Preparing our candidates for the Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) observation assessment for in-service teachers should also improve retention. Our field supervisors and methods faculty have participated this year in NYCDOE’s training program, for its own Administrators, to evaluate teachers and can use that training in preparing our candidates. Also, a major cross-campus conference was held for faculty on the in-service performance-assessment.
    • Provide Induction Support (support to beginning teachers) to our Graduates. CUNY faculty will begin to visit their graduates in their classrooms during their first year of teaching. Onsite support of first-year teachers should increase the likelihood of their staying in the classroom. This effort is being supported by funds from the MOU with NYSED on faculty professional development and by our partnership with MƒA. MfA provides professional development and stipend support to new teachers (yrs 1-4) through their “Early Career Fellowships” for teachers of secondary mathematics. About 1/3 of these fellowships are earmarked for CUNY graduates.

Plans and timeline:

All activities continue going forward. Analyses on the data will begin to be conducted this year. Faculty will continue to participate in the DOE training on performance-based assessment. The induction support visits will start more systematically this year.

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Goal #6.1: Enhance academic advising

Team leader: Wilks/Zoe

Team members: Linderman, Sanchez

Summary:

This team was charged with developing a strategy to analyze current academic advising services and resources, and to make recommendations for improving academic advising across CUNY. The OAA Advisement Study Group was established in fall 2011 with cross-campus and cross-departmental representation from academic affairs, student affairs, professional advisors and faculty.  Charged with making recommendations for improving student advisement, the Study Group reviewed the findings of the Graduate NYC! Advisor Survey and Catalogue of CUNY Advisement Models and Practices and prepared a report of Findings and Recommendations.

Recommendations from the report will be addressed by an Advisement Implementation Task Force in 2013/14.

Progress toward indicators:

  • First draft of the Advisement Study Group’s Findings and Recommendations was completed and presented to EVC Logue for review and comment in September 2012.
  • Comments and recommendations were incorporated into a second draft of the report, circulated, and a revised draft was submitted for review in January 2013.
  • The Advisement Council issued a “wish list” for Degree Works in May 2012 and several of their recommendations were taken into consideration during this last phase of CUNYFirst implementation.
  • After a final review by OAA, the was released and shared with advisement staff across CUNY with key recommendations and plans in three areas— to enhance advisement technologies; evaluate advisement program effectiveness; and examine advisement training and certification models.
  • CUNY OAA hosted several meetings of the Advisement Council with representatives from the DegreeWorks Council to discuss how we can optimize implementing DegreeWorks and identify other advisement tools that can contribute to meeting the recommendations from the CUNY Advisement Study Group.
  • An Optimizing Advisement Technologies Project Status Report was prepared to summarize that state of Degree Works optimization and utilization in the context of CUNYFirst and Pathways implementation.
  • First draft of a work plan and timeline was prepared to be reviewed, fleshed out and implemented by a new Advisement Implementation Task Force.

Plans and timeline:

Central OAA will convene a working group to implement the recommendations of the Advisement Study Group Report, engaging the Registrar and appropriate CIS/Degree Works staff as well as advisement personnel from campuses. In 2013/14 the working group will direct its efforts in two complementary directions: first, identifying key system functionalities and ensuring that they are appropriately implemented on all campuses; and second, developing management, workflow, and training protocols designed to maximize effective use of the system by faculty, staff, and students.

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Goal #6.2: Best Practices in Student Affairs: Foundations of Excellence® (FoE)

Team leader: Sanchez

Team nembers: Wilks, Wach1, Beck

Summary:

Foundations of Excellence will initially focus on four colleges plus the Central Office. These four institutions will participate in a self-assessment and, heavily invested in data collected throughout the process, will yield a new vision for evidence-based strategies in student and academic affairs. This year-long process will identify best practices in student affairs to be implemented on all CUNY campuses regardless of the campus’s resources, institution type, or campus organization. Foundations of Excellence will also set expectations regarding the identified best practices, determine their prevalence, and take action to ensure their presence on every campus.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Foundations of Excellence Summit – June 7, 2013
    • Panel moderated by Vice Chancellor Frank Sanchez with all four Presidents from colleges participating in FoE (President Scott Evenbeck, Guttman Community College; Interim President William Fritz, College of Staten Island; President Marcia Keizs, York College; President Gail Mellow, LaGuardia Community College)  discussed the benefits of participating in the year-long FoE self-study and steps toward implementation
    • Discussions/presentations led by John Gardner and Betsy Barefoot included: FoE Action Plan implementation, how to execute action steps and the role of assessment
    • Colleges’ final FoE reports with recommendations on how to better serve first-year students are due August 2013. Final reports by LaGuardia CC and Guttman CC have been completed.

Plans and timeline:

  • Goal 6.2 ends August 2013. Grant period  is September 2012 – August 2013. 

1. Howard Wach assumed Karrin Wilks’s role on the Central Office FoE team upon her appointment as Interim Senior Vice President and Provost at Medgar Evers College in early March.

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Goal #6.3: Student Affairs assessment/effectiveness plan

Team leader: Sanchez

Team members: Beck, Dalpes

Summary:

Develop and implement a quality indicator system across the Division of Student Affairs functional units.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Quality Indicator System
    • Student Affairs assessment working group was formed. Included all SA University Directors. Met regularly throughout 2012-13 and included presentations on assessment and “building a culture of evidence” as well as hands-on workshops on how to write measurable performance indicators/learning outcomes;
    • Performance Indicators for Child Care, Services to International Students, CUNY LEADS and the Women’s Centers were completed and submitted to the Vice Chancellor;
    • Presentations and workshops on performance indicators/learning outcomes conducted for the following councils: Child Care, Advisors to International Students, Veterans Council, Mental Health and Athletics.

Plans and timeline:

  • Complete indicators for: Services for Students with Disabilities, Career Centers, Veterans, BMI, Health, Mental Health and SEEK/CD – fall 2013
  • Assessment working group to focus on data collection, analysis and data-driven decision-making – ongoing throughout 2013-14
  • Increase the ability of SA to conduct data analysis – fall 2013
Create dashboard for Student Affairs’ website – spring 2014

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Goal #7.1: Complete Board-Mandated Steps for the Second Year of the Pathways (Transfer) Project

Team leader:  Logue

Team members: Baker, Croke, Crook, Dreifus, Fields, Kapp, Ptachik, Wrigley, Zoe

Summary:

We are on track for full implementation of the Pathways (transfer) project in fall 2013, in accordance with the CUNY Board of Trustees June 2011 resolution.

Progress towards success indicators:

  • The Board of Trustees has now approved approximately 2,000 courses for the Common Core.
  • Every single campus now has approved by the Board the courses it needs for every category of the Common Core.
  • The Board of Trustees has now approved the Pathways general education structures for all of the campuses.
  • Courses leading into 10 of the largest transfer majors have been identified by faculty committees.  These courses will be available at each campus with the relevant major so that students can start a major at such a campus and transfer without losing major credit.
  • Degree Works scribing with the new requirements is ongoing.
  • Training of advisors is ongoing.
  • A new central Pathways website and separate Pathways websites for each campus now provide extensive information.
  • A Student Rights and Responsibilities document has been developed for Pathways, along with an appeals process for students who feel that they have been unfairly denied transfer credit.
  • A streamlined version of the Common Core Course Review Committee continues to review new Pathways courses from the campuses.
  • Hundreds of fall 2013 incoming students have registered in Pathways courses, and the total enrollments in these courses now surpass 200,000.

Plans and timeline:

  • By fall 2013 we will provide campuses with suggestions and assistance with regard to assessing whether or not Common Core courses achieve their learning outcomes.
  • As we move into the implementation of Pathways in fall 2013, there will be continuous assessment of the correspondence of the implementation to the Board of Trustees June 2011 resolution.
  • The first review of the Pathways implementation will be conducted during the 2013-2014 academic year.
During 2013-2014 we will consider adding to the list of 10 majors that have courses leading into them CUNY-wide.

 

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Goal #7.2: Incentivize students to register for an average of 30 credits or more in each academic year

Team leader: Ptachik

Team member: Murphy (Budget & Finance)

Summary:

This team has worked to align tuition and fee structures with increased credit accumulation, analyze data and adjust advising structures, and implement an intervention specifically for students entering the third semester.

Progress toward success indicators:

Meetings have taken place between Academic Affairs and Budget and Finance. Some draft modifications have been discussed. Meetings are being scheduled with four college presidents to determine interest in participation in pilot projects starting in Fall 2013.

Plans and timeline:

Meet with colleges with the objective of selecting two to participate in a pilot project.

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Goal #7.3: Implement CUNY CareerPATH

Team leader: Mogulescu

Team members: Duitch, Richardson, Spaulding (Labrador)

Summary:

CUNY CareerPATH will complete its second grant year on September 30, 2013. Training programs are running at all eight colleges within the consortium. Kingsborough Community College and Central Office’s Continuing Education and Workforce Programs Department jointly support program implementation.

Progress towards success indicators:

  • All eight colleges are offering training that allows students to earn college credits or gain advanced standing upon enrollment into degree programs, making college degrees more accessible to participants. Each college negotiated these credit articulation agreements; one particularly notable arrangement is between two different colleges, BMCC and Hostos.
  • Colleges are experimenting with various methods of integrating academic and content instruction to help students perform well in their training programs, jobs and academic careers.
  • The majority of colleges developed relationships with local employers to offer students internships so that participants gain experience in the workplace.
  • All colleges are offering CUNY Language Immersion Program (CLIP) sections, where the curricula have been contextualized to industry sectors and career exploration has been integrated into the program.
  • CUNY CareerPATH staff are working with CUNY Start to develop and pilot an adapted curriculum based on career-focused, health coursework.
  • CareerPATH staff are providing intensive technical assistance to consortium colleges on advisement best practices derived from other successful college programs including ASAP and CUNY Start.
  • The program is undergoing a rigorous qualitative and quantitative evaluation. Preliminary evaluation results are shared with colleges and used to improve the program.
  • CareerPATH staff members have built strong relationships with the New York State Department of Labor and the New York City Department of Small Business Services, which have assisted with recruiting qualified participants, assisting with job placement and providing access to wage record data to track student outcomes.
  • As of April 2013, the program enrolled over 1,000 participants, and approximately 350 participants have completed the program, earned industry-recognized credentials and earned or banked college credits. The majority of participants are still enrolled in the program.

Plans and timeline:

  • Central Office and Kingsborough Community College will continue to track and monitor college outcomes, ensure DOL compliance, implement the formal program evaluation, provide technical assistance to the consortium and individual colleges, and support program management.
The CareerPATH program will run through September 2014.

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Goal #7.4: Develop a framework for evaluating and implementing recommendations of the CUNY Jobs Task Force.

Team leader: Mogulescu

Team members: Duitch, Richardson, Spaulding

Summary:

In 2011, Chancellor Matthew Goldstein convened the CUNY Jobs Task Force, led by Vice Chancellor Rick Schaffer, aimed at helping institutions of higher education understand available jobs and industry needs. A final report of the Task Force outlined a set of recommendations, which centered on improving CUNY’s understanding of industry needs, building stronger relationships with industry, and finding ways to better respond employers. An action plan was developed, which included the proposal to create a new Office of Workforce Partnerships and a request for University support for the Labor Market Information Service (LMIS), located at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • CUNY negotiated and executed an agreement with the State Department of Labor, which will provide CUNY and SUNY access to unit-record data for tracking student employment outcomes.
  • The Office of Institutional Research and Assessment (OIRA) has identified a final candidate to fill the position of Senior Labor Market Policy Analysis, who will lead CUNY’s efforts to analyze data on student employment outcomes.
  • The LMIS Director was transitioned to a tax levy line, building CUNY’s capacity to analyze labor market trends and respond to industry needs.
  • Staff from OIRA, Continuing Education and Workforce Programs and the LMIS have met regularly to discuss implementation of the findings of the Jobs Task Force, as well as the Governor’s Jobs Linkage Initiative, which is aligned with this work.
  • The creation of a new position (associate director) to head the Office of Workforce Partnerships was approved and a search committee was identified. A search was conducted, but the search was unsuccessful; the recommended candidate declined CUNY’s offer of employment.
  • Presentations on the task force report and its findings and recommendations were made to internal stakeholders, including student leaders and government relations staff. 

Plans and timeline:

  • Staff are currently reevaluating the Office of Workforce Partnerships position, including job duties, salary level, the job description and recruitment process to determine whether changes are warranted to bring in a larger pool of qualified candidates.
  • The next six months will focus largely on implementing the requirements of the Jobs Linkage Initiative, in partnership with OIRA.
Continuing Education and Workforce Programs staff will continue to meet regularly with OIRA and the LMIS to discuss implementation of the findings of the Jobs Task Force report.

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Goal #8.1:  Continue to serve the City of New York through projects and partnerships with City and State agencies, and generate external funds to support these efforts.

Team Leader: Mogulescu

Summary:

Amount and renewal of external funding. City and state satisfaction with projects. Number of people served.

Progress toward success indicators:

During the 2012-2013 year, grants were secured totaling $54,932,329. These grants came from a broad range of public and private funders, including City, State and federal government agencies, and both local and national philanthropic organizations. 

The programs supported include those in K-12 education, preparation for and transition into college, college success programs, literacy/GED preparation, health and social services, continuing education and workforce development, professional development and quality improvement in the field of early childhood education, student internships and subsidized jobs, support for students and other individual on public assistance, and the field of interactive drama and applied theatre.

The programs served approximately 62,000 individuals, including middle and high school students, youth and adults transitioning to and in college degree programs, and working adults seeking educational credentials and career advancement.

Plans and timeline:

We will continue the activities supported by this funding, meet established performance outcomes, and develop new projects to be funded.

 

Goal #9.1: Increase effectiveness of CUNY’s libraries

Team leader: Kendrick

Team members: Bryan, Clark, (CIS; Council of Chief Librarians; Library Committees)

Summary:

Continue to evaluate move to vendor hosted support for mission critical library systems. Work with CIS to ensure that hardware and network infrastructure is adequate for the needs of CUNY's libraries and for the needs of CUNY's students, faculty and staff. Work to integrate information literacy across the CUNY curriculum, develop information literacy support materials including assessment tools, and sponsor information literacy related professional development activities. Determine Phase 2 plans for the DOE/CUNY Library Collaborative and align with Graduate NYC project. Work with colleagues in procurement and legal offices to rationalize procurement processes. Advocate for role in statewide efforts towards procurement reform, either directly or collectively via the New York State Higher Education Initiative. Assist UFS with development of institutional repository.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Our main library application was successfully migrated to new servers in November 2012.  Other system migrations, such as EZ Proxy and DSpace went well. Planning is underway for migrating to Version 21 of the Aleph software. 
  • A contract was signed for the acquisition of the PRIMO discovery service.
  • Presentations took place at Lehman College, Baruch College and the Graduate Center on Open Access/Scholarly Communication.
  • The Office of Library Services and the Office of Academic Technology have been collaborating with the members of the University Faculty Senate to plan the development of a CUNY-wide institutional repository. Explorations have included looking at the feasibility of building an institutional repository as a service connected to the successful Academic Commons.
  • CUNY is working through the New York State Higher Education Initiative and in close concert with a strategic sourcing team operating through the NYS Office of General Services (OGS) to implement the reforms secured in the budget.
  • We continued to work with colleagues in the New York City Department of Education on initiatives to bridge the gap between research skills sufficient for high schools and those necessary for college.
  • After an extensive evaluation process the libraries have selected an e-book vendor. 
  • The IT Steering Committee and the Council of Chief Librarians have adopted the principle that CUNY students should have access to electronic resources and a computer network in the library regardless of their campus of origins. 
  • Project Sunlight has been rolled out to the library community along with a reminder that librarians do not have the authorization to sign contracts or renewal forms. 

Plans and timeline:

  • Upgrade to Version 21 of Aleph – Summer 2013
  • Secure funding for Institutional Repository – Spring 2014
  • Improve Procurement Processes – Winter/Spring 2014
Continued programs between CUNY and DOE – ongoing

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Goal #9.2: Develop and implement productivity measures for CUNY colleges

Team leader: Littman

Team members: Chellman, Kendrick, Maruca, McDonnell, Lee

Summary:

The team has reviewed existing productivity studies and related data collections to identify appropriate metrics to track institutional productivity at CUNY.  Review and discussions have led us to take a three-pronged approach: 1) proceed with work on regression-adjusted graduation rates as initially developed by OIRA for the PMP; 2) pursue a parallel approach to #1 using IPEDS institutional level data to allow for national comparisons; and 3) review the requirements and data specifications for the Delaware Study of Instructional Costs and Productivity to determine if CUNY participation is feasible.

 

Progress toward success indicators and plans

The team identified and reviewed a number of reports about higher education productivity – both theoretical and practical – to gain an understanding of the various ways productivity has been defined and measured. We prepared a bibliography and developed a typology of productivity reports to help frame our thinking about applications for CUNY.

 

1)    Members of OIRA along with the team leader, after consultation with other experts at CUNY, developed a methodology to compute regression-adjusted graduation rate metrics for CUNY colleges. These were incorporated into the PMP this year along with the standard unadjusted graduation rates, and were taken in to consideration in rating the colleges on their progress on the relevant PMP objective (improve retention and graduation rates). Several presentations of methodology and results to various CUNY constituent groups took place throughout the year and relevant documentation was developed to facilitate the communication of the methodological details and results. The PMP data book contains a five year trends of RAPM data results [1] . In addition, team members presented this work at AEFP in March as part of a panel on applications of regression adjusted methodologies in higher education, and submitted a paper to Education Administration Quarterly (awaiting disposition),

2)    The team identified a set of models for benchmarking CUNY against national data in the work of Kelchen and Harris who distinguish among various regression models – each appropriate for a different audience/perspective (value-added, policy-maker, family) using institutional data from the Integrated Post-secondary Education Data System (IPEDS). Our data gathering and analysis for this prong will continue in the coming year.

3)    CUNY’s Office of Institutional Research and Assessment reviewed the specifications for the Delaware study and created a preliminary map of data elements required for that study onto our existing data.  It was determined that OIRA’s existing data resources make it feasible for CUNY to participate in the study. Data work will begin later in the summer and data submissions to the study will begin in the new year.


[1] See http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/ira/ir/ data-book/current/accountability/PMPUniversityReport_2012-13_Final.pdf <pdf> pp. 28-37 – document page numbering.

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Goal #9.3: Effect Academic Affairs Sections of CUNY First

Team leader: Ptachik

Team members: Murphy, Murphey, Bianco

Summary:

This team has worked with CUNYfirst technical team and subject matter experts to implement campus solutions module in as many CUNY colleges as can benefit.

Progress toward success indicators:

All Wave 3 colleges (York, BMCC, Hunter, Brooklyn, CSI, and NYCCT) are well underway in campus solutions implementations for fall 2013.  Planning is underway for remaining colleges (CCNY, Baruch, John Jay, Graduate Center, and Medgar Evers) to implement during 2013-2014 academic year. Five colleges have implemented native financial aid (Lehman, Hostos, Law School, Guttman, QCC)

Plans and timeline:

Preparation continues for the launch of 5 Wave 4 colleges for campus solutions for fall 2014.  Preparation also continues for implementing native financial aid for ten colleges (Hunter, Brooklyn, Queens, CSI, BCC, KCC, BMCC, NYCTC, York, LCC) also for fall 2014.

While prior implementations have provided excellent learning opportunities for Wave 3 colleges, there is less resource available to help the colleges. Financial aid is extremely complex and the tolerance for error approaches zero.

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Goal #9.4: Modernize admissions data systems

Team leader: Ptachik

Team members: (CIS)


Summary:

Through the CUNYfirst project or other means, implement system to modernize admissions data systems including customer relations management, on-line intelligent application, decision engine, and student data-base components.

Progress toward success indicators:

CRM system implementation is close to complete across CUNY (both Hobsons Connect and Hobsons Retain).  Ten instances of Graduate Hobsons Connect continue to be run at 8 colleges with graduate programs (3 instances at Baruch). An implementationof full admissions for both undergraduate and graduate admissions is scheduled to be completed by early summer of 2014 to be effective for the 2015 admissions year.

Plans and timeline:

Concerns still exist about the timetable for this project. There are also reservations about Oracle’s ability to find sufficient consulting expertise to support a simultaneous graduate and undergraduate effort.

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Goal #9.5 Increase effective administrative oversight of SEEK/CD

Team leader: Williams

Team members: Ast, Kingston, Maruca, Murphy (Abbata)

 

Summary:  

This team has worked to refine the SEEK/CD funding model to better align program size and effectiveness with available NYS and campus resources and to build on the success of the Baruch SEEK UMLA to develop and pilot new recruitment/admission models to address the precipitous decline in URMS, particularly blacks, at highly selective colleges.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Major developments: First, the OSP researched the budget models used in three state-funded programs and learned that the CUNY model is the most prescriptive and provides the fewest incentives for program performance. Second, the OSP gained access to the UBO reports and shared them with college programs. Third, the OSP initiated a Mid-Year Expenditure Report and required under-expended programs to provide a plan in order to receive subsequent funds. Fourth, the UBO agreed to sweep unexpended SEEK/CD funds at the close of the fiscal year.
  • The OSP reintroduced the discussion of establishing a College Discovery program at the Guttman Community College with members of the Chancellery, the SEEK/CD Enrollment Management Committee, and the President of the Guttman Community College. The decision was made not to fund a CD program at the college because the student support offerings of Guttman are so robust that they negate the need for an opportunity program.
  • As a means of piloting projects that would inform our enrollment management work to address demographic shifts and enrollment trends that impact the SEEK/CD mission, the OSP issued an RFP, “Considering New Recruitment and Admission Models.” The programs at Baruch, Queens, and Hunter Colleges were funded for recruitment projects; Brooklyn and Lehman Colleges piloted service projects that are intended to increase the success of underrepresented students.

Plans and timeline

  •  During 2013-14, the OSP will continue the budget monitoring practices outlined above. The OSP will work with the SEEK/CD EM to develop a budget model that takes into account student performance and program management using the metrics identified in the SEEK/CD Goals and Objectives Report. The model will be vetted among the SEEK/CD Directors Council and the SEEK/CD Assessment Committee.
  • In addition, the OSP will reissue the enrollment management RFP and review the outcomes from last year’s funded projects in fall 2013 when the final reports are submitted.
  • The OSP, the SEEK/CD Assessment Committee, and the SEEK/CD EM Committee will develop recommendations for Special Programs recruitment practices.
  • Recommended changes to the budget model and enrollment/recruitment practices will be submitted to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.
  • Work is expected to continue over the next two academic years.

 

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Goal #9.6 :   With CIS, Develop the Decision Support Infrastructure at CUNY

Team leader: Crook

Team members: Chellman, Casazza, Place (Jacobs, Ullman)

Summary:

This project has two strands of activity. The first is to install business intelligence (BI) software, use it to extract data from CUNY first and OIRA’s legacy data warehouse, configure it for reporting purposes, and prepare reports for the chancellery and the colleges. The second is to prepare data to be incorporated into New York State’s P-20 data warehouse. This warehouse will eventually enable analysts to track students from grade school through college and beyond. 

The two projects are related. The BI project will allow OIRA to harvest data from CUNY First in order to make the information available to the statewide warehouse project. (We can provide this information now from legacy systems, but must transition to the new data environment.) 

Progress toward success indicators:

After a lengthy procurement process, the purchase of a suite of BI tools was completed in November 2012. This suite of software consists of the following: OBIEE, Goldengate, ODI, and OBIA software. We received training on ODI as well as data warehouse design. From November to March we met weekly with CIS to define the scope of the project to align it with the available staff resources, which are extremely limited. We have established good working relationships with CIS staff and have succeeded in installing and configuring the hardware and software architecture need for the project. We have obtained project management services and recruited a talented analyst who will assist with modeling, report preparation and a variety of additional tasks.  We have continued our work of learning how to extract daily refreshed student data from CUNY First and translate it into recognizable enrollment categories. For the P-20 project, we have met successive deadlines in submitting the required extracts to the state for inclusion in the warehouse. 

 

Plans and timeline:

This is a project that will unfold over several years in phases. The rate of progress will be affected by the staff resources that can be deployed. During the summer and fall of 2013 we expect to hire an implementation partner to evaluate solutions, provide technical advice and training, and expert staff. We will program ODI to draw daily refreshed data from CUNY First and census data from the Institutional Research Database (IRDB) and integrate it for purposes of reporting. We will be gathering reporting requirements for the faculty workload collection, and modeling data structures to sustain reporting using OBIEE. In 2014 we will be releasing a series of online reports on faculty workload and enrollment

 


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Goal #9.7 :   As part of the Graduate NYC! Initiative, Complete Construction of a Data Warehouse Containing DOE and CUNY Data

Team leader: Crook

Team members: Casazza, Chellman (Michelle Paladino [NYCDOE])

Summary:

Complete the design of the data warehouse. Populate key tables. Design reports. Support the data needs of the Graduate NYC! Project. Enable data analysts at the NYCDOE and CUNY OIRA to track students from grades 9-12 to CUNY and to prepare accountability reports and analyses supporting policy decisions of the two organizations.

 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The basic structure of the warehouse has been designed, including the extracts to be drawn from NYCDOE and CUNY, and the configuration of hardware and software required for the necessary reporting.  The software and hardware has been installed and configured.  We have overcome a series of technical challenges associated with this process.  We are now at work resolving problems with the installation of DBFS software, which will store the source files after they have been extracted from DOE and CUNY databases.  We have just begun to populate the database and to design the fact and dimension tables on which the first set of reports will be based. 
  • We have decided to incorporate this project into the larger decision support project described in 9.6 in order to take advantage of common software and staff resources. 
 

Plans and timeline :

  • Fall 2013:  We will complete the cleaning and loading of key data elements from both the DOE and CUNY. 
  • Spring 2014:  We will complete the design of data structures needed to track students longitudinally from the DOE to CUNY and to report on their progress.  We will make available online for DOE researchers the “Where are they now” reports and related data.  We will prepare a series of reports and analyses to advance the research agenda of Graduate NYC!   We also plan to pursue additional funding to sustain this work.


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