2009-2010 Progress Reports

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Goal # 1.1: Continue planning for new community college

Team leader: Mogulescu

Additional team members: Meade, NCC planning team

Summary: In February 2008, Chancellor Goldstein charged John Mogulescu with developing a

new community college (NCC) that would substantially improve students’ engagement, persistence and associate degree attainment within three years.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • 4 second-round working committees convened and produced reports in late spring/summer. 
  • Faculty committees formed to develop eight majors for a Letter of Intent by August. 
  • At the invitation of the Gates Foundation, an application was submitted and approved for a supplemental planning grant for an 18 month period from August 1, 2010, to January 31, 2012, bringing the total support from the Foundation to $1.1 million. 
  • Eight faculty searches have been initiated for positions in as many subjects. Offers have been made for tenure-track positions in six subjects. 
  • Dr. Scott Evenbeck, a Dean at IUPUI, selected as President of NCC. 
  • Facility at 50 W. 40th Street identified and BoT approval received in June to negotiate a 10-year lease. The Mayor’s Executive Budget included $8.9 million for NCC. 
  • Organized seven focus groups with Global Strategies Group to gain feedback on the NCC model, majors, and marketing. 

Future plans:

  • Prepare for phased occupancy of W40th St facility. 7/10 – 6/11
  • Plan leadership transition for new president. 7/10 – 1/11
  • Secure additional external funding, including Gates matching requirements. 7/10 – 7/11
  • Conduct searches for registrar and CIO. 7/10 – 10/10
  • Complete drafting of Letter of Intent for Initial Programs of Study (8). 8/10
  • Review and distribute second-round working committee reports. 8/10
  • Finalize fall 2010 NCC faculty appointments. 8/10
  • Initiate and conduct second round faculty searches 9/10 – 6/11
  • Initiate consortial faculty arrangements, as needed. 9/10 – 6/11
  • Draft application and conduct self-assessment for NYSED approval. 9/10 – 11/10
  • Arrange and host site visit for external reviewers. 9/10 – 11/10
  • Initiate application for Middle States accreditation. 9/10 – 6/11
  • Finalize documents for Board of Trustees.12/10

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Goal #1.2: Accelerated Studies in Associate Programs (ASAP)

Team leader: John Mogulescu

Additional team members: Linderman, Ondrus, Rini

Summary: This team has worked to continue to serve new and existing ASAP students and measure the success of the program with funding from CEO and other external sources

Progress toward success indicators:

  • As of September 2009, 340 students or 30.1 percent of our original cohort of ASAP students graduated after two years in the program. A fall 2006 comparison group of similar students had a 2-year graduation rate of 11.4 percent. An additional 325 students are on track to graduate by September 2010, which would realize a 3-year graduation rate of nearly 60 percent. The fall 2006 comparison group had a 2-year graduation rate of 24 percent.
  • Based on high 2-year graduation rates for the 2007 cohort, the Office of the Mayor’s Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO) approved the adoption of a new cohort of 350 double-exempt students in fall 2009 across all six community colleges. Given strong interest in the program and aggressive recruitment, the program over-enrolled and had a total of 430 new students in fall 2009.
  • ASAP secured a grant in the amount of $188,594 from the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women (JFEW) to launch a transfer scholarship and advisement program for 48 high-performing ASAP students who will matriculate to Baruch, Hunter, Brooklyn and Queens College in fall 2009.
  • ASAP was recently awarded $3.7 million from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust to expand the ASAP program and support a transfer scholarship program for ASAP graduates matriculating to CUNY senior colleges in fall 2009.
  • The Helmsley grant will also support a 5-year random assignment study of ASAP to be led by MDRC. A total of 700 students will be recruited for the study in spring and fall 2010 and will be randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. Both groups will be tracked for three full years. Findings will be shared in two interim research briefs and a final report to be published by MDRC.
  • In November MDRC received a grant for $1.1 million from the Robin Hood Foundation to support the ASAP random assignment study and to expand the study to include 200 students at LaGuardia Community College in fall 2010. Between the three colleges, a total of 900 students will be recruited to participate in the random assignment study.

Future plans and timeline:

  • In academic year 2010/11, pilot an evening and weekend program for working adults at one community college and possibly expand to one comprehensive college, pending the availability of additional funding from the Mayor's office.
  • In the current academic year, write an article on ASAP outcomes for publication and present findings in a conference setting.
  • Over the current academic year, establish a dialogue with non-CUNY institutions engaged in cohort-based associate degree programs with similar goals to exchange best practices and compare outcomes

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Goal #1.3: Preparing teachers for high-need instruction areas

Team leader: Lucariello

Additional team members: Baker, Corrente, Rini, Wrigley (Sacks, DOE, RF)

Summary: The original “success indicator” was movement from the Teacher Academy to a junior-senior-master’s model of teacher preparation. However, success indicators must be more broadly construed to include any significant effort to support the preparation of teachers for high-need instruction areas.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Support of the NYC Teaching Fellows Program (NYCTF) by success in securing an
  • AmeriCorps National Education Awards Program 2009 –2010 Continuation Grant:
    • Due to an IG Report, AmeriCorps audited the NYCTeaching Fellows Program and RFCuny in Aug 09. We successfully passed the monitoring activity and obtained the continuation grant. (Award Amount to RFCuny: $554,300)
    • An additional $11 million was secured in Education Awards for 2300 NYCTeaching Fellows (1400 returning for their second year of teaching; 900 entering teaching this fall after summer preservice). These Education Awards ($4,725 each) are used to defray educational expenses for obtaining a master’s degree. Hence, they help to recruit Fellows into the Program and help keep them in teaching for a second year.
  • CUNY’s continued participation in the NYC Teaching Fellows alternative certification program.
  • Ongoing Support for TOP (Teaching Opportunity Program) alternative certification program: TOP is an alternative certification program that is run out of the Central Office. The AmeriCorps Education Awards secured in the Continuation Grant (noted above) help support TOP Scholars, who use these awards to defray tuition costs for their MA degrees at CUNY. The Central Office is providing funds for the current cohorts to complete the program. TOP is currently being paused, as the shortage of teachers in NYC has waned.
  • Working with Math for America (MFA) on developing a CUNY-MFA partnership: The plan for this alternative certification route would be to bring MFA Fellows (20-40 per year, dependent on market factors) to CUNY for their master’s degree training. The MFA Fellows will be in addition to those that come to CUNY campuses from the NYC Teaching Fellows Program.

Plans and timeline:  

CUNY will continue its historic mission of teacher preparation, training teachers for high-need areas and schools through its participation in alternative certification programs, such as the NYC Teaching Fellows Program, and through its traditional certification programs. Currently, NYC is not experiencing the teacher shortage in high-need areas that it had experienced during the past decade. Given that fact, CUNY will carefully monitor the local need for teachers; if an accentuated need arises, this goal will once again be emphasized within OAA priorities. 


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Goal #1.4: Enhance the use of technology in nurse education

Team leader: Ebenstein

Additional team member: Rini

Summary: This team seeks to increase capacity in nursing simulation, integrate electronic health records (EHR) into the curriculum, increase the use of e-portfolios, and increase the number of online courses.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • A Hunter-led consortium of nursing programs at 12 CUNY schools has been awarded a five year, $1.4 million federal HRSA grant to integrate technology into nurse education. The purpose of CUNY’s Nursing Education Consortium in Technology is to increase the use of simulation, informatics, telehealth and other technologies as teaching and learning tools. Over five years 350 CUNY nurse educators will participate in this faculty development project. The simulation centers at Hunter, QCC and KCC will serve as training sites.
  • The Operating Agreement for the CUNY-NYU Simulation Center at Bellevue was signed; the Steering Committee had its first meeting and considered budget and personnel matters. The state-of-the-art Simulation Center is expected to open in September 2011.

Plans and timeline:

  • Progress in enhancing the use of technology in nurse education is university-wide and ongoing.
  • In 2010-11 we plan to build upon CUNY’s new Nursing Education Consortium in Technology as the infrastructure to further this goal.

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Goal #1.5: Improve clinical competencies of nursing students

Team leader: Ebenstein

Additional team member: Ondrus

Summary: This team is working to implement preceptor trainings at affiliated health facilities.

Progress toward success indicators:

A pilot project funded by the New York City Council was implemented at St. Vincent’s Catholic Medical Center (SVCMC) with BMCC. Staff nurses received preceptor training to support an enhanced clinical learning experience for BMCC nursing students. The project was completed in the spring 2010 semester punctuated by the closing of SVCMC. A final report was prepared by Barbara Tacinelli, the nurse educator who coordinated the project for BMCC. The report reinforced the idea that preceptor training represents a fundamental way to improve the clinical skills of our nursing students, and to facilitate closer working relationships between CUNY nursing programs and their affiliated clinical sites.

Plans and timeline:

The integration of preceptor training into the clinical component of other CUNY nursing programs is continuing. However, this particular goal will be incorporated into the broader 2010-2011 goal to “align health professions programs with the new federal healthcare reform legislation.”


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Goal #1.6: Establish Academic Commons

Team leader: Otte

Additional team member: Kendrick

Summary: This team has worked to showcase effective practices, share ideas and innovations, and involve a significant number of participants University-wide. 

Progress toward success indicators:

Plans and timeline:

  • Work on the functionality of the Commons continues apace. Recently, an HTML editor was created for all posts, for instance. And sophisticated tracking features allow for detailed weekly reports of site traffic to the subcommittee of the CUNY Committee on Academic Technology supervising the Commons.
  • The new virtual servers secured for the Commons with OAA funding are being brought online. The capacity of the 16 servers ensures that the Commons will be scalable and stable for the foreseeable future, however great its growth. And a backup and fail-over site at Baruch is in the process of being established.
  • Recent presentations at local and international conferences have elevated the profile of the Commons, already esteemed among open source developers. Requests to consult on creating similar sites at Yale, Georgetown, and other institutions indicate the extent to which the Commons has established itself as a highly regarded resource.

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Goal #1.7: Continue work of the Committee on Academic Technology

Team leader: Otte

Additional team member: Kendrick

Summary: This team works to develop consensus around effective practices and procedures for online and tech-enhanced instruction and use of e-portfolios. 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The 2009-2010 academic year was the second year for the CUNY Committee on Academic Technology (CAT), which meets monthly and corresponds extensively online (through the CUNY Academic Commons).
    • Correspondence includes regular reports from a number of subcommittees, including
    • A Blackboard subcommittee (meeting biweekly with CIS senior staff)
    • An Academic Commons subcommittee (see progress report for Goal #1.6)
    • An Eportfolio subcommittee (now connected with the international AAEBL)
    • A subcommittee on Standards & Practices (re online teaching and learning)
    • A Videoconferencing subcommittee (focused on instructional uses of audio-visual media, application sharing, lecture capture, and synchronous communication)
    • A Software Site-Licensing subcommittee (focused on provisioning of campuses and disciplines through University-wide or campus-based licenses and discounts)
  • These subcommittees have moved work forward on a number of fronts:

The Eportfolio subcommittee is using the Academic Commons Wiki to model the sharing of resources in eportfolio development.

  • Among (many) other things, the Blackboard subcommittee is consolidating Blackboard help documents and tutorials developed by the campuses.
  • The Software Site-Licensing subcommittee has recommended and is monitoring changes to the licensing of software in CUNY.
  • The Standards & Practices subcommittee is working to overcome barriers to work in online and hybrid instruction, especially by younger (pre-tenure) faculty.
  • The Videoconferencing subcommittee developed and circulated an RFI, made selections from the responses, and will shortly be meeting with selected vendors.
  • For the Academic Commons, see the progress report for Goal #1.6.
  • CAT as a whole has supported cross-campus communication and collaboration for a number of key academic technology projects.

Plans and timeline:

Over the past two years, the CUNY Committee on Academic Technology has established itself as an important advisory group and clearinghouse for academic technology projects in CUNY; it will continue to function in that capacity for the years to come.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu


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Goal #1.8:  Improve and Streamline CUNY Procedures for Fostering International Education Experiences for Students

Team leader:  Wrigley

Additional team members:  Phaphouvaninh, Williams

Summary: This team seeks to clarify and improve CUNY procedures for developing, approving, and arranging international education experiences for students, with focus on insuring academic quality and implementing appropriate forms of risk management. 

Progress toward success indicators:

  • International insurance specifications were submitted to the Procurement unit in order for the University to begin the RFP process for a contract that would cover all students going abroad on CUNY-sponsored international trips and programs.
  • The CUNY International Travel and Program Guidelines (developed by OAA, the Office of the General Counsel and the Office of Environmental Health, Safety, and Risk Management) is undergoing final review and will be submitted to a Fall 2010 CAPPR meeting for review before going to a Board of Trustees meeting. The document lays out guidelines for the development and approval of safe international trips, and includes forms, checklists and other tools for faculty and staff to use while planning such programs and trips.
  • In collaboration with OAA, the CIS office has researched the existing CUNY practices and national best practices on international travel data collection, with the goal of creating in-house or purchasing a database to track students, faculty, and staff who are traveling internationally on CUNY-sponsored programs or business.
  • A report summarizing student participation in international programs during the 2008-09 academic year was distributed to the University early this summer.

Plans and timeline:

  • The CUNY Tuition and Fees Manual is being reviewed for possible revisions to the policy that currently serves to deter faculty from organizing and fully disclosing international programs and trips.
  • A document titled  “CUNY Education Abroad Guidelines” is being drafted that will focus on the administration of study abroad and exchange programs in terms of registration, financial aid, credit transfer, tuition and fees, etc.  The projected date for review of the document with the relevant CUNY offices will be October 2010.
  • The Presidents’ Ad Hoc Committee on International Education met with campus international education liaisons in March 2010, where they heard about the primary barriers to study abroad for students.  A memorandum outlining those areas was developed and will be provided to the Committee when the group reconvenes in the Fall 2010 semester.
  • A survey on 2009-10 international program participation will be due from the campuses December 2010, with a report to be drafted in spring 2011.

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Goal #1.9 Plan for starting a school of pharmacy

Team leader: (Philipp)

Additonal team members: Ebenstein, Wrigley, committee members

Summary: This group worked to evaluate the fiscal and academic resources needed for a School of Pharmacy and to develop the outlines of a plan for establishing such a school.

Progress toward success indicators:

 

  • The group hired a consultant with expertise in the establishment of pharmacy schools. He advised the group on many aspects of establishing a pharmacy school at CUNY, with particular emphasis on the resources that would be required in terms of faculty members and facilities. He also advised on options in terms of academic structure and on the level of student enrollment and tuition that would be required to sustain a school.
  • The group extensively discussed each of these issues and evaluated a number of possible organizational arrangements for a pharmacy school at CUNY. Overall, the group recognized the community benefits from CUNY becoming the first public university in the region to establish a pharmacy school, but also recognized the considerable costs and resource needs of such a school. 

Plans and timeline:

Further work on a School of Pharmacy depends on CUNY’s resources and priorities in an era of budget uncertainty.


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Goal #1.10: Professional doctorates

Team leader: Wrigley

Additional team member: Ebenstein

Summary:

This group aimed to prepare a White Paper on the organization of professional doctoral programs at CUNY, with analysis of the pros and cons of different organizational models, and to begin to effect recommendations.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The Working Group evaluated the changing academic landscape created by the spread of professional doctorates. These degrees have become particularly common in the health sciences. When the Graduate Center was established in 1961, it was given sole authorization to offer doctoral degrees. That situation changed in recent years as City College and Hunter acquired the authority to offer joint doctoral degrees in four laboratory sciences and City College also obtained sole authority to offer the Ph.D. in Engineering. The spread of professional doctoral degrees raises new issues for CUNY in terms of which colleges should be authorized to offer these degrees.
  • The Working Group prepared a report and recommendations. The issue was discussed by a variety of bodies at CUNY, including the Academic Council and the Council of Presidents, and the groups accepted the report’s recommendation that authorization for new professional doctoral programs at different CUNY colleges be handled on a case-by-case basis.

Plans and timeline:

The work of this team has been completed.


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Goal #2.1: In keeping with the framework of the Decade of Science, enhance research commercialization and economic development

Team leader: Small

Additional team member: (Budget/Finance)

Summary: This team works to increase tech transfer efforts, form start-up companies, etc.

Progress toward success indicators and future plans:

  • The Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) has taken an aggressive approach this year, working with faculty and the IP committee to protect IP but also to find licensing partners. One early invention (from the 1990s) has been sold to a third party for a one-time fee and a percentage of any future royalties. Several licensing agreements are currently under negotiation. Some technologies are under option with venture capitalists for evaluation. Campus visits and presentations by the TCO took place throughout the academic year.
  • The CUNY Center for Advanced Technology (CUNY-CAT) is working with several faculty start-up companies who have been successful in obtaining a number of stage-one SBIR grants. They are on-target for surpassing the NYSTAR-required industrial match for the current year.
  • The Director of the TCO is working in close collaboration with the Director of the CUNY CAT to assemble the full portfolio of CUNY IP that could benefit from further external support and or is ready for commercialization. We are also working closely with the Executive Director of Business and Industrial Relations in efforts to support and commercialize projects in this IP portfolio.

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Goal #2.2: Create mechanisms to support increased inter-campus research collaborations

Team leader: Small

Additional team member: Caplan

Summary: This team seeks to increase the submission of collaborative, cross-campus external grant applications.

Progress toward success indicators and plans:

  • Day-long symposia are planned to bring faculty from each of the science flagship areas together for research talks and round-table discussions regarding future funding opportunities. The symposium for Photonics took place on January 14th and over 90 CUNY faculty and students attended and participated in the symposium. One outcome directly following the symposium was the submission of an IGERT training grant preproposal to the NSF. This team has been invited to move forward with a full proposal. A day-long symposium on CUNY Environmental research is being planned for fall 2010.
  • The Research Office is also sponsoring day-long inter-campus visits by CUNY faculty. These are designed to encourage research collaborations by introducing faculty to their colleagues. The faculty member spends a day visiting another campus and hearing about their research first-hand and at the same time gives a seminar on their own research. For example, junior science faculty from York College each spent a day at Queens College and gave seminars in the Queens Neuropsychology seminar series.

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Goal #2.3: Enhance research, including by graduate students and undergraduates

Team leader: Small

Additional team members: Ebenstein, Corrente

Summary: This team works to increase the number of relevant grant applications and publications, focuses on faculty research fellowships, sponsors research conferences, and concentrates on improved IRB and dissertation proposals (graduate students).

Progress toward success indicators and plans:

  • A major drive to enhance research across the university this year was related to the opportunities available through stimulus funding. We took a lead role in leading faculty to the various opportunities through a dedicated web site, meetings on campuses, and also working one-on one with campuses regarding large proposals. To date, CUNY faculty have received over $41 million in grants and contracts through stimulus funds.
  • The Office of the University Dean for Health and Human Services has funded Dr. Barbara DiCicco Bloom as a Distinguished Lecturer in the Doctor in Nursing Science program for the 2009-10 academic year to strengthen CUNY's faculty in the area of nursing research. Her background includes funded NIH grants for research. She is teaching courses on research methods and working with doctoral students on their dissertation proposals and research.
  • The Office of the University Dean for Health and Human Services has funded research stipends of $2,500 each for four MPH students: two from Hunter and two from Lehman. They are working on projects that are being supervised by the Director of Research at CUNY's Institute for Health Equity.
  • We have encouraged undergraduate research directly through the sponsorship of summer fellowships, specifically on an NIH-funded Center grant in systems biology. We also introduced a new summer research program for undergraduates both from within CUNY and for students from the outside. This new program ran from June 7 through July 30, 2010, and we supported 19 students in this first year.
  • We have also sponsored and run a number of grant-writing workshops throughout the year. These workshops have been held both centrally and on individual campuses and are aimed towards assisting faculty in their efforts to attract external funding to support their research.

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Goal #2.4: In keeping with the framework of the Decade of Science, take next steps on ASRC

Team leader: Small

Additional team members: (Development, Facilities)

Summary: This team continues to plan for the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC).

Progress toward success indicators and plans:

Plans for the ASRC are progressing as the foundations of the building are being poured.  The design is basically completed after much faculty input, and the operating guidelines for the building have been established (see http://web.cuny.edu/research/Advanced-Science-Research-Center.html). This year the Chancellor appointed a faculty advisory committee who are working with us on identifying specific equipment to be purchased, as well as potential recruits to the open directorship positions. We also plan to start a search for an Executive Director who will be the Chief Operating Officer.

The core facilities will include a clean room for diagnostics and fabrication, and will include equipment for deposition, etching as well as an optical microscope, a surface profiler, an ellipsometer and a scanning electron microscope with e-beam writing. With these tools it is possible to both fabricate nanostructures and to study their physical, electrical and optical properties.  The ASRC will house also state-of-the-art imaging facilities that will include:

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers (NMRs)
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
  • Cryo electron microscopes
  • Transmission and scanning electron microscopes
  • Confocal and fluorescent microscopes

The top floor of the ASRC, as well as a rooftop observatory, will support research efforts in all aspects of remote sensing including: sensor development, satellite remote sensing, ground-based field measurements, data processing and analysis, modeling, and forecasting.

The Center will also house a 100-seat auditorium, a small education center that will feature key highlights of the five science disciplines supported in the building, and a cafe.


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Goal #3.1: Enhance academic performance of SEEK/CD students on OIRA success measures and develop an assessment model

Team leader: Williams

Additional team members: Ast, Jordan, Littman, C. Wade

Summary: The OSP/OAA team continued to refine the Special Office data reports and to support and monitor student performance outcomes.  The Assessment Working Group met throughout the spring semester with the agenda of developing a comprehensive set of recommendations designed to enhance the assessment efforts in SEEK and College Discovery programs.

Progress toward success indicators:

The OSP and OIRA finalized templates for two sets of annual data reports for Special Programs: The first will report enrollment trends and patterns, and the second will report student performance outcomes. 

The following highlights from the Fall 2009 reports suggest that Special Programs student support services are enabling program students (who are inadmissible under their respective colleges’ admission criteria) to succeed:

  • The five year enrollment trends show level enrollment in SEEK and a slight (2%) increase in CD. 
  • One year retention rates in associate programs were 10 percentage points higher for Special Programs students than for “regulars.” One year retention rates in baccalaureate programs were 80% in Special Programs and 81% for “regulars.”
  • Eighty percent of incoming SEEK freshmen earned GPAs of 2.0 or higher as compared to 81% of “regulars.” In community colleges, 70% of new freshmen earned GPAs of 2.0 or higher as compared to 68% of regularly admitted students. 
  • Mean CPE pass rates of Special Programs students were equal to those of regularly admitted students at the senior and comprehensive colleges and 4 percentage points higher at the community colleges.

The OSP awarded a total of $100,000 in response to the annual SEEK RFP which targets projects that will enable programs to better achieve goals and objectives. Additionally, the OSP supplemented STOCS funding to enable approximately fifty SEEK students to participate in study abroad programs.

Plans and timeline:

  • The OSP will review the Assessment Working Group report during the summer and circulate it for feedback from the Special Programs professional councils in Fall 2010. 
  • Upon completion of the review, the OSP will develop an action plan based on the recommendations and response to the report.
  • The OSP will review the Annual Performance Reports submitted by each program and work with directors to establish appropriate goals for the coming academic year.

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Goal #3.2: Increase student success in math

Team leader: Logue

Additional team members: Crook, Jones, Kendrick, Lucariello, Ondrus

Summary:  The team has continued to focus on ways to encourage, identify, and disseminate best practices in math pedagogy, including ensuring that accurate information about math standards and performance are widely available.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • College readiness in math: Analyses and policy discussions and decisions continue as part of the initiative with the DOE led (on CUNY’s part) by Senior University Dean John Mogulescu (see Goal 3.5). This initiative concerns NYC public high school graduates’ college readiness, and it recently applied for additional funding from the Gates Foundation. One part of this initiative involves CUNY raising its standards for exemption from math remediation, and aligning those standards with the new high school Math Regents curriculum and exams.
  • Ten funded undergraduate math education research projects, with a total of 27 CUNY faculty PIs, are all now in progress, with just one pending IRB approval.
  • In June 2010 a successful conference on teaching math with technology was held, including presentations by the fall 2009 winners of the math faculty awards, and a workshop for the PIs of the funded math education research projects.
  • Purchase of live online math tutoring is now in the procurement process.
  • The CTI immersion method of math remediation has had promising results and is being expanded this coming fall as CUNY Start.
  • We have begun a research project with Ithaka to assess the effectiveness of high-quality online vs. traditional introductory statistics.  There will be a pilot at Baruch in fall 2010, to be followed by a randomized assignment experiment at several campuses in spring and fall 2011.
  • Design of an experiment comparing different methods for delivering math remediation was completed and several funding sources are being explored.

Plans and timeline:

  • We will continue to support—financially and scientifically—the funded math education research projects so as to bring them to a successful conclusion by the end of 10-11.
  • We will consider offering another math conference in June 2011, perhaps to showcase the results of the funded math education research projects.  
  • The remediation working group (Goal 3.4) will release a report, including reexamination of the placement cut points, with subsequent cutpoint modification as appropriate.
  • During the next year we will continue to explore good indicators for an early warning system for inadequate performance in math courses.
  • During 11-12, we will select, train, and deploy the first Quantitative Reasoning Fellows.
  • The next math faculty awards will be in spring 2011 so as to coordinate with the next CUNY-wide online math competition for students, and perhaps with the next Math conference.

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Goal #3.3: Promote information literacy system-wide

Team leader:  Kendrick

Additional team members: Littman, Otte

Summary: This team is working to enable results of CUNY online information literacy tutorial examination to be emailed to students’ home campuses; analyze iskills™ test results; investigate SAILS as alternative assessment vehicle for information literacy; work on extending CUNY-wide information literacy learning objectives to 120 credits.

Progress toward success indicators

  • Results of the CUNY online information literacy tutorial quizzes can be emailed to professors at students’ home campuses. More than 1700 people have taken the quizzes. Several faculty now require students to have test scores sent to them.
  • Results of iskills™ have been analyzed. A group of faculty from Hunter conducted an analysis of the SAILS assessment and published a peer reviewed article on the findings. [1]
  • The LILAC Assessment Subcommittee established a research project assessment rubric.
  • LILAC hosted a presentation “LILAC PRESENTS Creditable Strategies: The Library Course in the CUNY Curriculum; is a credit-bearing library course the right choice for your library?”
  • A preliminary annotated list of tools and resources for teaching information literacy created by CUNY libraries has been created. 
  • Introductions were written for the ICT modules explaining how each ICT module corresponds to the LILAC learning goals and objectives.

Plans and timeline

  • Develop and submit grant to support CUNY’s Master Plan 2008 – 2010 objective of working with major New York City employers to certify that students have successfully met CUNY’s information literacy goals upon graduation.
  • Investigate options for supporting the Information Competency Tutorial, currently hosted by Hostos Community College. Identify quiz management support options.
  • Explore the development of a collaborative online platform for information literacy tools and resources for all CUNY faculty and staff.
  • Continue to create assessment rubrics for students, with at least 45 to 60 credits, to evaluate papers across the curriculum and CUNY campuses. Distribute LILAC rubrics to all subject departments across CUNY campuses and link them to writing assessment.
  • Draft a preliminary framework for learning goals for upper level undergraduate and graduate students, perhaps with a disciplinary focus.
  • Establish an information literacy blog.
  • Explore opportunities for collaboration with instructional technologists to create digital learning objects for information literacy.

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Goal #3.4: Determine if policies concerning remediation need to be changed and if so, how

Team leader: Crook

Additional team members: Wrigley, Aries, Dreifus, Hofmann, Jones, R. Moy, Ondrus, Voloch,

Summary: This team is working to obtain evidence regarding impact of current remediation policies and propose any appropriate policy changes.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The group has completed a survey of math chairs at the 10 CUNY colleges that offer remediation in mathematics. The purpose of the survey was to gather systematic data on the cut scores used to place students into remedial math courses, the consistency with which exemptions based on the SAT and NYS Regents Exams are being honored, the criteria for exiting from remediation, and the cut scores used to place students into the lowest-level credit courses.
  • We have identified several key issues: the practice by some colleges of placing exempt students into remediation after COMPASS retesting, inconsistent placement and exit criteria, and inconsistencies in the awarding of credits and equated credits for similar math courses. The working group prepared a detailed report summarizing these practices and offering a set of recommendations designed to introduce greater consistency across the university. In the coming year, the working group will assist the Executive Vice Chancellor with implementing these recommendations.   

Plans and timeline:

  • In 2010-11, the working group will turn its attention to reading and writing remediation, reviewing current policies and practices and developing recommendations for change.  This work will be presented in a report.  
  • The research will take place during the fall semester, and the report will be issued in the spring of 2011.  During that semester, the working group will assist the Executive Vice Chancellor with implementation of the appropriate recommendations. 

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Goal #3.5: CUNY and DOE College Readiness and Success Working Group

Team leader: Mogulescu

Additional team members: Conrad, Mack, Steering Committee

Summary: This team represents CUNY in the collaborative effort by CUNY and DOE to improve the college success rates of DOE graduates at CUNY

Progress toward success indicators:

  • CUNY and the DOE sponsored four working committees which developed recommendations to address academic alignment; college awareness and planning; research and data sharing; accountability and sustainability.  These committees were integral in the development of a citywide Action Plan to increase college success.
  • As the work has evolved, the Working Group is in the process of streamlining its efforts by dissolving the committee structure and creating project-based teams that will focus on specific tasks, initiatives or research required to support CUNY’s and DOE’s efforts related to college readiness and completion.
  • In October, 2009, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation awarded New York City a Communities Learning in Partnership (CLIP) Planning Grant for $250,000 for the period November, 2009 through June, 2010.  The grant builds off the Working Group’s efforts to achieve the following:
    • Clearly define and communicate important determinants of “college readiness” and “college success”.
    • Increase the number of students who graduate from high school having met “college readiness” standards.
    • Increase the number of high school graduates who enroll in colleges that are an appropriate match for their level of preparation.
    • Improve the degree-completion rates of high school graduates in CUNY colleges.
    • Develop a mechanism for tracking and rewarding progress toward these goals.

Plans and timeline:

  • Using the CUNY/DOE data exchange, in May, the DOE released data reports to HS principals that track the performance of high school graduates as they enter college.  CUNY is in the process of developing similar reports for college leadership, anticipated to be released fall 2010, that track persistence, determinants of college success, and graduation rates.  
  • In June, CUNY and DOE submitted a comprehensive implementation plan to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for the second phase of CLIP funding, which could be as much as $3 million over a three year period.  The funding announcement is expected late July.

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Goal #3.6: Accountability for CUE Programs

Team leader: Aries

Additional team members: Jones, Wrigley

Summary: This group worked to develop an accountability system for colleges receiving CUE funds.

Progress toward success indicators:

The group changed the system by which colleges receive CUE funds and how reported on how they used them. In the past, colleges submitted proposals detailing how they would spend CUE funds. In practice, however, funds tended to be allocated in accord with past practices and colleges had freedom to move funds between categories as they wished over the year, with no review by the Central Office.

The Working Group changed the system in several ways: 1) it adjusted CUE allocations to create more equity on a per student basis, and 2) it no longer required proposals; instead, in the spring of the academic year colleges that received funds must account for how they have spent them and what outcomes they achieved from their expenditures.

Plans and timeline: The Office of Undergraduate Education will continue to move toward a system requiring higher accountability for CUE spending and will also focus more on outcomes achieved from CUE allocations.


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Goal #3.7: Coordinate and facilitate work of Centers for Teaching and Learning

Team leader: Aries

Additional team member: Otte

Summary:

This team’s intent was to increase coordination and communication among CUNY’s Centers for Teaching and Learning. 

Progress toward success indicators:

Center leaders met together to share information on approaches and strategies for improving teaching and learning at CUNY.

Plans and timeline: The Office of Undergraduate Education will continue to try to bring greater coordination to these centers, with the aim of them learning from each other and maximizing their effectiveness.


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Goal #3.8: Increase Student Success in Writing

Team leader: Aries

Additional team members: Crook, Dreifus, R.Moy

Summary: The original success indicators of this group were: to increase student success in writing; improve measures of student success in writing; identify the range of writing programs; identify existing quantitative data source to measure the effectiveness of existing interventions; and report on the impact of writing programs to enhance student success in writing.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Early in the year, this group began to focus on improving writing in developmental courses. The team was therefore was folded into Goal Group #3.4 (“Determine if policies concerning remediation need to be changed and, if so, how.”)
  • However, independent of this goal group, the Office of Undergraduate Education was completing work that was begun in 2008-09 to evaluate the WAC program. WAC coordinators completed a comprehensive survey that identified the methodologies being used to assess student writing, the place of writing within the college curricula, and organizational variables that impact program effectiveness. During spring 2010, the report was written and distributed to the WAC coordinators.

Plans and timeline:

The above-mentioned report will be discussed at the first CUE meeting of the fall 2010 term. The original focus of this goal group will continue within the framework of group #3.4


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Goal # 4.1: Performance Gaps

Team leader: Crook

Additional team members: Anderson, Aries, Chellman, Kendrick, Ptachik

Summary: This team is addressing group differences both in access to CUNY and in academic performance, in keeping with NASH “Access to Success” initiative. The team is also refining analyses and metrics to chart progress and develop an action plan which, with assistance of the Chancellery, will be executed at the colleges.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • For more than a year, OIRA has been supporting CUNY’s participation in the Access to Success Initiative, coordinated by the National Association of System Heads (NASH) and The Education Trust. Under this initiative, 23 public higher education systems have committed to reducing by one-half the gaps in access to higher education and academic performance experienced by under-represented minority groups and low-income students.
  • Building on earlier work, in which the Office of Policy Research (OPR) identified and reported on these gaps at CUNY, OIRA has begun an intensive analysis of leading indicators of success. We are coordinating this work on leading indicators with seven other higher education systems as part of a project with the Education Trust. Following definitions agreed upon in a November meeting, we have prepared an extensive report showing gaps in leading indicators in the following areas: progress through remedial course sequences, success in gateway courses, credit accumulation and GPA in first year, retention and graduation.
  • We have built a data file specifically designed to facilitate the construction of statistical models to predict academic success at the beginning of the first term and in subsequent terms. 
  • Partnering with researchers at NYU’s Institute for Education and Social Policy, OPR has been modeling an early alert system. A paper proposal based on this research has been accepted for presentation at the annual conference of the Association for Public Policy and Management. 

Plans and timeline:

The ultimate goal of this work is to identify a set of indicators that could be incorporated into early alert systems for the colleges. Once we are confident that we have identified a set of academic success indicators that have predictive power, we will demo the model at colleges expressing interest in adopting an alert system. An effective alert system could be an important tool for reducing gaps in academic performance among racial groups and between men and women.   


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Goal #5.1: Begin to increase retention of CUNY graduates in the teaching profession in NYC high-need schools

Team leader: Lucariello

Additional team members: Crook, Littman

Summary: This team has worked to obtain relevant data and propose strategies.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • In September 2009, we secured a continuation grant from AmeriCorps ($11 million) to support Educational Awards for 2,300 NYC Teaching Fellows and Teaching Opportunity Program Scholars. These Educational Awards make a significant contribution to teacher retention. Fourteen hundred awards are for returning teachers (Fellows who are entering their second year of teaching). Nationally, there is a very high teacher drop out rate after the first year of teaching, and these Educational Awards provide resources to help Fellows continue on into their second year of teaching. These resources also make it easier for those Fellows completing their summer preservice to enter their first year of a teaching position and remain in that position for the year.
  • We are establishing a CUNY “Teacher Education Data Book” by working with OAA’s Office of Program Review, Articulation, & Transfer and campus Deans and Chairs to make all program codes current. We are also working with OIRA and campus institutional research and teacher education staff to be sure data is consistent across databases. Such a data book will help us determine preparation program elements that relate to retention.

Plans and timeline:

  • We are gaining access to NYCDOE retention data from ’05 onward regarding CUNY alumni teaching in NYC schools. This will enable us to establish baseline measures and targets for improvement of retention. Heretofore, CUNY had no access to this data.
  • We are working with Math for America (MFA) on developing a CUNY-MFA partnership that would strengthen clinical preparation, which is an important factor in retention. MFA identifies (and engages in further professional development of) Master Teachers. The plan is for these teachers to serve as cooperating teachers for CUNY campuses, thereby enhancing our candidates’ clinical preparation.
  • We will seek grant support to provide mechanisms and resources to increase retention rates of CUNY teachers.

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Goal #5.2: Enhance post-graduate data

Team leader: Crook

Additional team members: Littman, Wade

Summary: Our goal is to prepare, field and tabulate a system-wide survey of CUNY bachelor’s students. Such a survey has not been done for more than 10 years.

Progress toward success indicators:

To date we have:

  • Finalized the survey instrument;
  • Procured the services of a vendor to print and mail the survey materials and prepare an online version of the survey;
  • Secured a determination from the university compliance officer that the project is not research;
  • Through a locator firm, updated the addresses of the cohort of graduates to be surveyed—the graduating class of 2006-07;
  • Fielded the survey;
  • Cleaned and tabulated the data. 

Plans and timeline:

A tabulation of the results will appear in August 2010 on the OIRA website. During the fall  2010 semester, OIRA will conduct additional analyses of the data as requested.

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Goal #6.1: Ensure adequate student support services at each campus

Team leader: Wrigley

Additional team members: Aries, Jordan

Summary: The purpose of this goal group was to establish benchmarks for student support services.

Progress toward success indicators:

The availability of university counseling services is a growing concern on campuses throughout the country. As a first step in assessing the adequacy of CUNY’s resources in this area, a memo was prepared concerning standards related to university mental health counseling services. The memo reviewed the standards set by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc. (IACS) and the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher  Education (CAS). IACS sets minimum staffing ratios for college counseling services. Almost 200 institutions are presently accredited by IACS. The CAS has published standards covering all of student affairs. Given the range of counseling services that fall under CAS, there are no stated staffing ratios. The memo identifies accepted benchmarks against which campuses could check their student support services.

Plans and timeline:

OAA will consider next steps in the benchmarking of student support services and ways to obtain the best campus data on the current availability of such services.


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Goal #6.2: Enhance advisement and career ladder opportunities for students in the health professions

Team leader: Ebenstein

Additional team member: Ptachik

Summary: This team worked to implement an undeclared health major, along with appropriate advising, and develop AAS/BS dual-degree programs in Nursing.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The undeclared health major for students interested in the AAS in Nursing was implemented in fall 2010.
  • QCC and Hunter submitted a letter of intent for an AAS/BS dual degree in Nursing and continue to make plans for the first cohort in fall 2011.  Discussions to develop similar programs are under way involving Hostos, BCC, and LaGuardia with Lehman; KCC with NYCCT; and BMCC with Hunter. OAA has provided funding for the Hostos, BCC, LaGuardia, Lehman working group, including summer stipends for nursing faculty for curriculum and program development and travel expenses to attend a national conference in this area. Multiple letters of intent are expected by the end of the fall 2010 semester.

Plans and timeline:

The planning for additional dual-degree programs in Nursing is continuing. However this particular goal will be incorporated into the broader 2010-2011 goal to “align health professions programs with the new federal healthcare reform legislation.”


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Goal #6.3: PSC Student Mentoring Project

Team leaders: Aries, (Silverblatt)

Summary: This team’s goal was to develop a plan for implementing PSC and CUNY contractual agreement to create a mentoring system for CUNY undergraduates.

Progress toward success indicators:

A number of meetings were held between PSC leaders and CUNY administrators to work out the specific goals and organization of a mentoring program. Ultimately, the PSC and CUNY administrators could not agree on how such a program would be organized.

Plans and timeline:

For the moment, this endeavor is on hold.


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Goal #6.4: “Coordinating academic support services (admissions, bursar, financial aid, and registrar”)

Team leader: *Ptachik

Additional team members: Bianco, Murphy

Summary:

This team’s purpose is to inventory the existence and functions of BARFIT (bursar, registrar, financial aid, IT) groups on CUNY campuses as a means to coordinate academic support services. In addition, at colleges where such groups do not exist, the team is working with senior administrators to help in their establishment.

Progress toward success indicators:

Progress in this area has been made with colleges that are in either Wave I or II of the CUNYfirst project. Dean Ptachik and the University Registrar have met with the BARFIT groups at these seven colleges to stress the importance of coordinating their activities both for purposes of CUNYfirst campus solutions implementation and for the general benefit of the colleges’ students. Examples of best practices from Queens and Queensborough have been discussed with the Wave II institutions.

Plans and timeline:

  • The major challenge in this area is the uncertainty of the CUNYfirst implementation schedule. Rollout of the first wave schools has been postponed from March of 2010 to fall 2010. Rollout of second wave schools is still to be determined. The Central Office team and the CUNYfirst subject matter experts are poised to meet with the BARFIT groups on these campuses to continue to stress the importance of coordinated efforts, but until larger scheduling issues are worked out, this effort has slowed.
  • We are hopeful that decisions on the phased rollout will be made within the next few weeks, and that this effort can be restarted.

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Goal #7.1 Articulation and Transfer

Team leader: Wrigley

Additional members: Beatha, Crook, Jordan, Littman, Norz, Ptachik, Sukhanova, Williams

Summary:

This team is assessing the nature and scope of transfer problems in CUNY and is considering policy options for reducing transfer problems.

Progress toward Success Indicators:

  • The group continued its analysis of why students often accumulate excess credits before graduating from CUNY. This problem affects significant numbers of native students (who start and finish at the same college), but is particularly pronounced among transfer students, more than half of whom graduate with over 125 credits. Three focus groups (one at Baruch and two at Queens) were conducted with enrolled students who had more than 120 credits but had not yet graduated. The students attributed the excess credits to a variety of causes, including transfer difficulties; lack of availability of required courses; changing majors; and from a desire to take additional courses to improve their GPAs. Seen in this light, transfer problems are part of broader difficulties navigating the college system, but
  • The group analyzed the particular transfer difficulties faced by students who pursue or attain AAS degrees. Roughly a third of CUNY AAS students transfer to baccalaureate colleges, so the AAS now functions as a transfer degree, but AAS students often must take many general education courses. This makes them more likely than any other group to acquire excess credits.
  • Using OIRA data, the group identified the main transfer pathways in CUNY. Sixteen majors in CUNY’s senior colleges enroll more than 100 transfer students. With some exceptions (such as psychology), most of these large transfer majors are found in small numbers of colleges, indicating the extent to which the colleges have developed their own distinctive academic specialties. The pattern should make it easier to simplify the transfer system.
  • The working group discussed transfer models and the advantages and disadvantages of each in relation to the CUNY system.

Plans and timeline:

A draft report on transfer problems and recommendations for reducing them should be ready by mid-August. After receiving feedback, the report will be revised and decisions will then be made about its distribution to different constituencies within CUNY.


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Goal #7.2 Management of increasing enrollment

Team leader: Ptachik

Additional team members: Crook, Jordan, Logue

Summary: This team works to ensure that colleges enroll only the number of students for whom they can provide a quality education. 

Progress toward success indicators:

CUNY and the colleges have agreed on enrollment targets for the fall 2010 semester. These targets aggregate to a 3 percent growth for fall 2010 and range from small decreases for a few colleges to increases of up to 5 percent. Colleges have also been advised of ways in which they might control enrollment to allow for more “space” for the groups the university has identified as priority: new freshmen and internal transfer students. Our progress towards meeting this goal is hampered by what is otherwise a very positive development, an increase in retention of current students. Spring admissions closed at most colleges at an earlier point than in prior years, although enrollment of continuing students continues to skyrocket.  At many colleges fall admissions closed earlier than in prior years and continuing student enrollment is up.

Plans and timeline:

The next key occasion in meeting this target is the fall “flash enrollment” which will be available in early September.


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Goal #7.3: Rationalize and implement system-wide policies via Office of University Registrar


Team leader: Ptachik

Additional team members: Bianco (CIS)

Summary: The Office of University Registrar (OUR) continues to rationalize and implement system-wide recordkeeping policies. The major effort for the current year continues to be to mediate the standardization goals of the CUNYfirst project student records component with the business practices of the college's registrar offices. Along with OIRA, the OUR will collect university-wide, college based data to form the basis for more accurate enrollment planning.


Progress toward success indicators:

  • Although the rollout of campus solutions for the wave I schools has been postponed from March 2010 to Fall 2010, the OUR has done much of the groundwork that will be required prior to implementation. The academic structure, which is the basis for all college recordkeeping and reporting, has been put in place for all of our colleges. The format of a CUNY transcript has been agreed on among our colleges and Oracle. The setup of college CUNY-wide tables of values for a large number of data fields has been completed and oversight and control now resides within the purview of the OUR.
  • On a second major front, the Transfer and Course Information division has joined the OUR and will play a major role in the new process for updating and maintaining the CUNYfirst Course Catalog and equivalency rules.

Plans and timeline:

  • OUR must continue to play the major role in mediating between the registrars and the CUNYfirst project as the various waves come online. In the near term this will be manifest in the office’s role in the required User Acceptance Testing (UAT) process that must precede implementation of the campus solutions module at the wave I colleges. The University is discussing with Oracle the possibility of an “expanded UAT” to take place during the summer semester at Queens and Queensborough which would allow a number of students, faculty, and staff to work with the PeopleSoft system under “real life” conditions, although at a low stakes level, since parallel processing would have taken place using the college’s legacy systems. OUR will play an active role in this effort.
  • OUR will play a major role in the R25 class scheduling software used at most colleges. CUNY has recently acquired the X25 reporting module for the R25 suite of products.  Over the course of the next year OUR will roll out X25 reporting tool for 10 colleges.  This implementation will include training provided by CollegeNet for the campus leads.
  • Working towards an opening date of 2012 for the New Community College, CUNY is now in the process of recruiting foundational staff to develop the structures and processes as well as establish a collaborative culture and the administrative foundation for the NCC.  The OUR will work with the NCC and play a role in developing the structures and processes for the student records and information services area.

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Goal #7.4: Increase online courses

Team leader: George Otte

Additional team members: Nancy Aries, Erika Dreifus

Summary: In 2009-10, this team’s goal was develop one online introductory course to be used CUNY-wide and develop more systematic support for and use of hybrid (partly online, partly in-class) instruction across the University.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • A plan for piloting online composition courses across CUNY was developed, reviewed, approved, and funded. It proposes to pilot campus-tweaked variants of an existing online course and then create a flexible standard for University-wide deployment. Six campuses (the maximum for which funding was available) are participating.
  • Another plan, this one for a University-wide initiative in hybrid instruction, was also been approved and funded. A Request for Proposals (RFP) was circulated in mid-December 2009, with a late January 2010 deadline for campus responses. Of the 15 proposals, 9 were funded. A “Hybrid Institute” was held in April for the core members of each participating campus’s team, and a group site and a group blog have been established for the participants.

Plans and timeline:

  • All the campus leads participating in piloting online composition courses have been doing course development over the summer, reporting that this has been proceeding satisfactorily, with all courses due to be ready and running for the Fall 2010 term. Each of those will be taught in multiple sections online. At the end of that term, there will be a debriefing and the collaborative development of a rich “master” course to be used for online composition going forward. Articulation will be sought for it CUNY-wide.
  • The hybrid initiative has used the Commons to extend work at the “institute” (designed to co-construct goals, answer questions, and equip the campus faculty development and tech support teams).  Midsummer reports (largely on late spring and early summer faculty development) indicate readiness for the fall 2010 term on the part of all 9 campuses. Hybrid courses developed for the initiative will begin being offered in fall 2010, with many of the offerings in the Spring 2011 term.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu.


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Goal #8.1: Continue to serve the City of New York through projects and partnerships with City and State Agencies, and generate external funds to support these efforts

Team leader: John Mogulescu

Additional team members: Other members of John Mogulescu’s staff

Summary:

This team develops projects in collaboration with City and State agencies and raises external funds to support these efforts.

Progress toward success indicators :

In FY10, the office raised over $47 million in city and state funding. Already in FY11, we have raised $43 million.

Plans and timeline:

During the remainder of the fiscal year, we will continue the activities supported by this funding, meet established performance outcomes, and develop new projects to be funded.


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Goal #8.2: Federal Stimulus Funds

Team leader: Small

Additional team members: Corrente, Duitch, Mogulescu, (Deputy COO Sacks)

Summary:

This group has focused on applying for and obtaining Federal stimulus funding, implementing new programs, and coordinating and monitoring spending.

Progress toward success indicators and plans:

  • To date, slightly less than $7.2 million in workforce development program awards has been made to the CUNY central office under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The vast majority of these funds are for the purpose of training and educating healthcare workers, including nurses and allied health technicians. Other funds are focused on the building trades and building operations, including building energy efficiency. With the exception of $250,000 from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, all are US Department of Labor funds.
  • As soon as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law, we initiated a major drive to enhance research across the university by encouraging and supporting proposals for funding available through this Act. We took a lead role in alerting faculty to the various opportunities through a dedicated web site, meetings on campuses, and also working one-on one with campuses regarding large proposals. Matching funds from the University were also offered to leverage specific proposals when appropriate. To date, CUNY faculty have received over $41 million in grants and contracts through stimulus funds. These include supplements to existing grants, new research awards and equipment grants.
  • The Research Foundation of CUNY, in cooperation with the University's central office and the Council of Grants Officers, established an ARRA Task Force, the purpose of which is to assure the smooth flow of information throughout the University, as well as the prompt and complete filing of required reports. As a prime recipient, the Research Foundation is required to submit quarterly reports on funding received through this Act.

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Goal #9.1: Increase use of technology in the libraries

Team leader: Kendrick

Additional team leaders: Bryan, Otte

Summary: This team has sought to improve backup and restore capabilities for the Aleph system. Implement the Aleph Reporting Center System. Provide resources to enable CUNY campuses to deploy Illiad system for resource sharing. Explore options for federated searching system. Explore, review, and implement as desirable and feasible other library systems to support the research, teaching, and learning of the University. 

Progress toward success indicators:

Backup and restore capabilities for the library database are in place and have been tested.  Backup and restore capabilities for the application are reported to be in place but have not been tested. The Aleph Reporting Center is still not operational.  Eighteen campuses have implemented the Illiad system. This system will enable greater resource sharing among CUNY’s libraries, and will also allow campuses to join IDS, a statewide resource sharing. The Office of Library Services (OLS) has implemented a federated searching tool from Ebsco as a pilot project. OLS has updated its webpage used by librarians CUNY-wide for information about systems, electronic resources, training etc. 

OLS and Council of Chief Librarians established a usability subcommittee to develop a more user-focused, data-driven model for future design improvements to the online catalog.  Established library systems committee with representation from all campuses to discuss technical issues related to library systems. CIS has hired a staff member, Alan Kok, to have primary responsibility for the library system. The process of switching the library system’s primary key from SSN to system-generated number has been completed.  A new test server for the library system was purchased.

Plans and timeline:

  • Work with CIS to test application restore procedures.  (Summer 2010) 
  • Work with CIS to implement new test server and test parallel indexing. (Summer 2010)
  • Migrate SFX link resolver to version 4.0. (Summer 2010)
  • Work with CIS and Ex Libris to resolve Aleph Reporting Center issues. (Summer 2010) 
  • Provide training assistance to colleges on Aleph Reporting Center (Fall 2010)
  • Secure funding for discovery service, procure and begin implementation. (Fall 2010 – Spring 2011)
  • Select approach for electronic resource management. Begin implementation.(Fall 2010)
  • Plan for migration to Aleph version 20. (Winter 2011)
  • Establish specifications for new production server and begin process of identifying financial resources to procure new server.  (Winter 2010)
  • Work with colleges to modify record deletion procedures and engage with OCLC for database reclamation project to ensure that CUNY holdings are more accurately represented in WorldCat.  (Spring 2011)
  • Upgrade training environment for campuses to test development work and be trained on new products and services. (Spring 2011)

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Goal #9.2: Enhance prioritization of OAA tech projects

Team leader: Otte

Additional team member: Kendrick

Summary: This team has worked to ensure that all OAA tech projects are submitted properly and prioritized and to aim toward an increased number of projects being completed on time.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Pursuant to a University-wide Computer Change Control Policy instituted in January and binding on all IT systems (that change requests must pass through a Computer Change Control Committee [C4] consisting of EVC Dobrin, EVC Logue, and AVC/CIO Cohen), an OAA Computer Change Control Policy was instituted in June. Essentially, it stated that change requests must come from the Senior Staff level and go through George Otte.
  • After the September C4 meeting, George Otte and Les Jacobs were formally made non-voting members of C4. Issues likely to come before the committee are taken up between them, together with concerned parties, in ad hoc meetings, held more or less weekly.
  • Projects are now properly submitted and tracked. Prioritization is more of a challenge because OAA priorities (timely completion, perceived importance of the proposed change) have to be balanced against CIS concerns (labor/effort/cost, impact on CUNYfirst), but these considerations are constantly in negotiation, and any sense that OAA priorities are not duly acknowledged is sure to get a hearing.
  • Of the 119 projects on the tracking list during the 2009-2010 academic year, 83 were completed, 7 more put on hold (or “non-active status”); the rest are active, with 3 projects overrunning project deadlines.

Plans and timeline:  

  • Meetings with OAA and CIS are ongoing, and each C4 meeting is preceded by an extended “pre-C4” meeting.  Representatives of some OAA units (e.g., Admissions and the University Librarian) meet with CIS fairly regularly to manage progress and clarify requirements.
  • The point of the Computer Change Control Policy is more than cost containment. It is about managing changes to legacy systems in the advent of CUNYfirst. C4 monitoring will continue at least until CUNYfirst is fully launched, though all changes mandate by legislation or regulations (“legs and regs”) will be made as required.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu.


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Goal #9.3: Effect Academic Affairs Sections of CUNYfirst

Team leader: Ptachik,

Additional team member: Crook (CIS, Deputy COO)

Summary:

This team is working with CUNYfirst technical team and subject matter experts to implement campus solutions module in as many CUNY colleges as can benefit from the software and to ensure that colleges are fully prepared before go-live. By early fall 2010, there should be a firm schedule which includes financial aid and admissions system milestones.

Progress toward success indicators:

For this goal, there was less progress made than CUNY had hoped for. Due to delays in the preparation of the required software and in producing fully cleaned data translated from our legacy systems, the planned go-live for campus solutions has been postponed from the scheduled March 2010 date. The scheduled go-live date is November 2010.  The decision to postpone go-live is in keeping with the first principle of the project, which is that software will not be rolled out without having achieved almost full certainty of success. 

Plans and timeline:

The new schedule for the implementation of the campus solutions module for wave I and future waves of schools is currently the subject of discussion between CUNY and Oracle. The schedule for implementation of PeopleSoft financial aid is similarly subject to current discussions.


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Goal #9.4: Modernize admissions data systems

Team leader: Ptachik

Additional team members: (CIS)

Summary:

This team is working to ensure that through the CUNYfirst project or other means there will be a plan to modernize admissions data systems including customer relations management, on-line intelligent application, decision engine, and student data-base components.

This team is working to ensure that through the CUNYfirst project or other means there will be a plan to modernize admissions data systems including customer relations management, on-line intelligent application, decision engine, and student data-base components.

Progress toward success indicators:

As with the overall CUNYfirst campus solutions schedule, progress on this front has not met with expectations. As of mid-July, CUNY is awaiting an admissions implementation plan from Oracle. Our interpretation of our agreement calls for the admissions system to be fully in place for the fall 2012 admissions cycle, meaning a system would have to be fully prepared, tested, and accepted by summer of 2011.

Future plans and timeline:

At this point, we are awaiting Oracle’s plan. Future action must await that event. 

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Goal #9.5: Establish administrative infrastructure for new School of Public Health

Team leader: Anthony Rini

Summary: CUNY is forming a university-wide School of Public Health with Hunter College as the lead campus. This new school will be a collaborative School of Public Health primarily involving Brooklyn College, the CUNY Graduate Center, Hunter College, and Lehman College, but other CUNY colleges will be involved as well. This project has received long-term attention; its goals for 2009-10 were to obtain CEPH program accreditation, formulate an integrated financial plan, recruit and hire senior leaders and faculty, and formalize an approved governance structure. 

Progress toward success indicator (since September 2009):

  • Three new administrative positions posted at Hunter College  (Academic Affairs Manager, Student Services Director, Student Recruiter) (September 2009)
  • New Faculty Hired:  Brooklyn (1), Hunter (4), Lehman (1) (September 2009)
  • Faculty Searches in Progress:  Brooklyn (1), Hunter (5), Lehman (1).
  • Application approved to proceed with accreditation process by CEPH (October 2009)
  • CUNY Legal Counsel working on finalizing governance documents for SPH (ongoing)
  • Groundbreaking ceremony for new SPH facility (November 2009)
  • Susan Klitzman named Acting Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (December 2009)
  • David Himmeletein and Stephanie Woolhandler hired to SPH faculty from Harvard Medical School.  Appointments effective fall 2010.
  • Student Services Director Hired, February 2010 
  • CUNY SPH Governance Documents and Memorandums of Understanding between four campuses (Hunter, Lehman, Brooklyn, and GC) under review by CUNY legal counsel (March 2010)
  • Draft Self Study Report completed and reviewed internally, March 2010.
  • Academic Affairs Manager Hired, March 2010
  • Draft Self Study Report sent to CEPH for review, April 2010.
  • Mock CEPH Self Study site visit, April 2010.
  • Ongoing planning regarding coordination of student admissions and student services
  • Preliminary Self Study drafted and reviewed for CEPH (June 2010)
  • CUNY SPH Web site launched (www.cuny.edu/sph) (June 2010)
  • CUNY Board of Trustees Approved SPH Governance Plan (June 2010)
  • SPH Preliminary Self Study Submitted to CEPH (July 2010)
  • New Faculty Hired for Fall 2010:  Brooklyn (1), Hunter (5), Lehman (1). 

Plans and timeline:

  • Complete administrative hires (ongoing).
  • Assist with faculty searches (ongoing).
  • Attend monthly SPH progress report meetings (ongoing).
  • Final Self Study to CEPH (November 2010)
  • CEPH Self Study Site Visit (December 2010)
  • Assist with search for permanent Dean (Spring 2011)

Back to Goals Chart >>


Goal #9.6: Establish procedure for financial review of proposed and existing programs.

Team leader:  Anthony Rini

Summary: The Department of Program Review, Articulation and Transfer in the Office of Academic Affairs reviews all campus proposals for new academic programs.  This review includes the standard New York State Education Department (SED)forms which are required for registering an approved program.  The SED forms examine program start-up (defined as 5 academic years) and capture cost projections for capital expenditures and program expenditures as well projected program revenue. The work for this goal was to establish a procedure for financial review of proposed and existing programs and communicating that procedure to the campuses.

Progress toward success indicator (since July 2009):

  • A draft template and instructions was constructed and was reviewed by several end users. 
  • Forms were successfully piloted by the Department of Program Review, Articulation, and Transfer in the Office of Academic Affairs.  Final version of forms and new program review manual reviewed and approved by EVC Logue (April 2010).
  • Forms and New Program Review manual distributed to campuses and in use (May 2010).
  • Goal has been met.

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Goal # 9.7: Increase effective administrative oversight of SEEK/CD

Team leader: Williams

Additional team members: Ast, Corrente, Jordan, Rini, St. Denny

Summary: This team has worked to establish a protocol and schedule for monitoring site visits of SEEK and College Discovery Programs and has collaborated with finance and financial aid officers to ensure close monitoring of Program budgets.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • The OSP conducted monitoring site visits of the SEEK and College Discovery programs at Lehman, Queensborough, and the College of Staten Island.  Draft reports were submitted to the leadership at each campus, and the OSP held follow up discussions with the directors and supervising vice presidents before finalizing the reports.
  • Working with the Office of Financial Aid and the OAA finance officers, the OSP established a protocol for dispersing tax levy funds to support Special Programs students who participate in STOCS sponsored study abroad programs.
  • The OSP collaborated with the Office of Financial Aid to establish protocols for better monitoring of SEEK and CD financial aid funds and oversaw the disbursement of unallocated funds to SEEK students with unmet needs. Worked with the OAA financial officers to realign the SEEK and CD allocations to individual colleges as a result of shifts in enrollment.

Plans and timeline:

  • In summer 2010 will establish the cycle of monitoring site visits for the coming academic year and consider changes in the model.
  • Will establish a monitoring protocol for financial aid expenditures now that the OSP has access to regular reports.
  • In fall 2010 the Special Programs Study Abroad Working Group will develop guidelines for supporting other than STOCS programs.

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Goal #9.8 Increase HR policies that facilitate academic goals

Team leader: (Waters)

Additional team members: Logue, Sukhanova, Wrigley, (O’Brien)

Summary: This group aimed to review and change CUNY’s HR policies regarding faculty as necessary to improve the University’s academic functioning.

Progress toward success indicators:

The group agreed on a new division of labor within the Central Office, under which HR would continue to have responsibility for the development and implementation of policies regarding staff members’ employment, while personnel matters related to faculty members would shift to the Office of Academic Affairs. The items to be shifted included the review of college requests for faculty salaries above base, early tenure, and extensions of the tenure clock.

Future plans and timeline:

The new division of labor has been established.

Back to Goals Chart >>


[1] Brian Lym, Hal Grossman, Lauren Yannotta and Makram Talih, “Assessing the assessment:

how institutions administered, interpreted, and used SAILS,” Reference Services Review, Vol. 38 No. 1, 2010

pp. 168-186 q Emerald Group Publishing Limited, consulted http://commons.gc.cuny.edu/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/group-documents/56/1268919297-LymEtAl2010.pdf <pdf> July 9, 2010.