2008-2009 Progress Reports

Download Full Set of Progress Reports <pdf>


Goal #1: Adjunct faculty orientation and support

Team leader: Erika Dreifus

Team members: Yasemin Jones, George Otte, Judith Summerfield

Summary:

By early February, our team had articulated several goals for the spring semester to help us reach the outcome of “evidence of enhanced adjunct performance and/or increased adjunct access to information that should increase their performance,” with an emphasis on the latter portion of that phrase.

Progress toward success indicators:

In keeping with our spring goals and targets, we continued to review materials received from the campuses, identified successful models of adjunct faculty orientation or support for dissemination system-wide, and consulted with a SUNY colleague (Elaine Maldonado).

We developed a centralized Web site to provide information for both adjunct faculty and those who are responsible for training and supporting them (http://web.cuny.edu/academics/oaa/uei/facresources/adjunct.html). We publicized this site among the Chief Academic Officers, to our campus contacts, and in the bimonthly OAA newsletter, Academically Speaking. In its compilation of campus and departmental adjunct faculty handbooks, featured teaching resources, professional development opportunities for adjunct faculty, and other materials, the site is intended precisely to increase adjunct faculty access to information that should increase their performance.

Future plans:

Our research and consultations with internal and external contacts led us conclude that while some further limited actions (a one-day workshop/discussion forum, for example) might be useful, adjunct faculty orientation and support is most likely best and most effectively pursued on the individual campus (and department) level. It is also possible that as the Academic Commons project progresses, the Commons might offer a forum for cross-campus collaboration and support in this area.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #2: Enhance research commercialization

Team leader: Gillian Small

Summary:

This work includes increasing technology transfer efforts, forming start-up companies, and building up the contributions of the CUNY Center for Advanced Technology (CUNY CAT).

Progress toward success indicators:

The Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) is now fully established at 57th Street under the leadership of the Director, Jake Maslow. The TCO currently has 101 active issued patents plus 235 active patent applications, of which 42 new patent applications and three new patents were done in FY09. Examples of new inventions that address multi-billion dollar markets include: wide-spectrum antimicrobial compounds embedded in textiles and plastics; advanced large-scale energy storage system for conventional and solar power plants; and metamaterials for advanced solar energy and infrared imaging devices. The TCO is pursuing licensing and new startups for these and other innovations.

We recently welcomed a new Director for the CUNY Center for Advanced Technology in Photonics Applications (CUNY CAT), Dr. David Crouse. The CUNY CAT is currently expanding the scope of its programs through more aggressive fundraising efforts, establishing collaborative research and technology commercialization efforts with other US and international universities and establishing new core laboratory facilities, small business support services, and education and outreach programs. CUNY faculty are working closely with industry in a wide variety of ways to transfer photonics technologies to market, including performing collaborative research and development with existing small and large technology companies and establishing CUNY spin-off companies. The CUNY CAT is exceeding its financial, research, educational and outreach goals.

Future plans:

Funding for the 2009-2010 fiscal year is expected to increase significantly due to increased support by three CUNY spin-off companies, and due to the establishment of focused research centers within the CAT, including a Center for Metamaterials.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #3: Increase research by faculty and doctoral students in health-related disciplines

Team leader: William Ebenstein

Team member: Michael Corrente

Summary:

This team seeks to support DNS students, some of whom are also CUNY faculty, in conducting interdisciplinary research and developing dissertation proposals.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • In association with the Doctorate in Nursing Science (DNS) program, the Office of the University Dean convened interdisciplinary research teams in areas of interest to nursing faculty and doctoral students. Three research teams were established in fall 2008.

  • Survey of CUNY Nursing Graduates (1997-2007): The survey was completed and a preliminary report was produced.

  • A Study of Social Capital in Acute Care Settings: Received approval to conduct the research at St. Vincent’s Catholic Medical Center (SVCMC) and an application to their IRB committee was submitted in July 2009.

  • An Analysis of CUNY Nursing Program Admission and Progression Policies on NCLEX Scores: The team is still trying to get access to NCLEX results by individual student (a sensitive subject) from campuses and/or the SED Office of the Professions. Once this is accomplished it is ready to submit a proposal to the CUNY IRB committee.

Future plans:

Fund a nurse researcher as a “distinguished lecturer” to teach research related courses in the DNS program and to support research activities by the doctoral students.

NB: For 2009-2010, this goal will be integrated into a broader university-wide effort to increase research by faculty and doctoral students that will be led by VC Small.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 4: Increase research on teaching and learning

Team leader: Judith Summerfield

Team members: Michael Corrente, Yasemin Jones, Erin Martineau

Summary:

The group worked to identify ways to centralize and disseminate information on relevant grant programs and to increase the number of applications to OUE’s faculty development grant program.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Centers for Teaching and Learning have disseminated potential grant opportunities to faculty networks.

  • Faculty development grant program was reshaped, resulting in an increase in applications (68 in 2009 compared with 33 in 2008). 15 applicants were selected to participate in a 2009-2010 Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
    University Seminar, focused on developing research questions, plans and publications about teaching and learning.

  • Games, Teaching and Learning Network established; 50 participants identified as interested in pursuing possible grants; held first panel discussion and presented 10 posters at annual Gen Ed conference.

  • CUE and Centers for Teaching and Learning Directors were apprised of the work conducted to achieve Goal #4, at regular meetings in the spring semester.

Plans:

As with Goal #3, work within this area will henceforth be folded within broader CUNY-wide research efforts.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #5: Institute research mentoring program for junior faculty and bridge program fund for senior faculty

Team leader: Gillian Small

Summary:

This work will establish both a research mentoring program (junior faculty) and a bridge program fund (senior faculty).

Progress toward success indicators:

The Research Office initiated a new Faculty Mentoring Program in 2009. This program pairs senior faculty members with early career faculty members to foster grantsmanship and facilitate grant proposal submissions in cases where a junior faculty member has been unable to identify an appropriate mentorin their own department or campus. Thus far we are supporting approximately 20 mentor/mentee pairs and continue to receive nominations from the provosts of junior faculty to be included in the program.

A bridge fund program is now operating through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research. Faculty who have had a consistent record of major external funding, and who then are not funded for one round may apply for bridge funding during the interim while they resubmit their unfunded proposal. The faculty member must have sign off from their provost since there is a matching requirement from their respective college.

The two initiatives have been established; the goal has been achieved.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #6: Revise IRB policies and procedures

Team leader: Gillian Small

Summary:

There is a need to revise the University’s “Policies and Procedures for the Human Research Protections Program” based on current regulatory guidance and current accreditation standards. The new policies and procedures must be approved by CUNY’s Board of Trustees.

Progress toward success indicators:

The process began by employing the services of a nationally recognized consultant to produce a draft reflecting the current regulatory and accreditation climate and CUNY-specific operations. During that process, and at the completion of that process, early versions of the drafts were shared with Institutional Review Board (IRB) chairs, IRB members and IRB staff, as well as with the former Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the Vice Chancellor for Research, members of the CUNY Office of General Counsel and the RF President and General Counsel.

The current version of the draft Policies and Procedures reflects the incorporation of suggestions and corrections made by various interested parties, and, most specifically, the Office of General Counsel. The draft has been circulated to the IRB chairs at the campuses and to the Chair of the UFS.

Future plans:

The final version of the Policies and Procedures document will be submitted to the Board of Trustees for adoption during fall 2009.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #7: Take next steps on the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC)

Team leader: Gillian Small

Summary:

The CUNY ASRC will support high-end research in five key areas: photonics, nanoscience, structural biology, neuroscience, and environmental sensing and water. The building is designed such that each area has approximately 1 floor. On the ground floor – which spans underground between ASRC and the new CCNY science building houses a shared animal facility as well as imaging equipment including NMR, fMRI and a state of the art clean room. Each science area will have high-end core facilities to support research. These facilities will be available to CUNY researchers – on a sign-up basis (with appropriate user fees). Each area must have a director. Major fund-raising campaigns are required.

Progress toward success indicators and future plans:

  • The construction team began breaking ground in January 2009. We continue to work on the operational plan, which must be carefully timed so that when the building is complete we have faculty and staff in place to run it.

  • We have recruited one faculty member (at City College) who will direct/oversee the Environmental Sensing and Water initiative: Dr. Charles Vörösmarty. He will move into the building once it is ready. The other new faculty will not be hired until the building is closer to completion.

  • Currently, we estimate that the building will be mostly completed in spring 2013. We have established an ASRC advisory committee and will work with this committee on items such as the search for the Executive Director and plans for future searches for Program Directors, the selection of equipment to be purchased, the establishment of a fee schedule for the use of equipment etc.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 8: Continue planning for new community college and/or infuse new community college ideas into existing community colleges

Team leader: John Mogulescu

Summary: In February 2008, Chancellor Goldstein charged John Mogulescu with developing a bold and imaginative plan for a new CUNY community college, one that re-imagined community college education from the ground up. The Chancellor's charge was driven by the need to respond to growing enrollments at CUNY's community colleges (enrollment has grown by 31.6 percent between 1999 and 2008) and the desire to create an alternate model of community college education aimed at raising graduation rates.

Progress toward success indicators: From February to August 2008, the planning committee, under the leadership of Tracy Meade and supported by a steering committee of Vice Chancellors and two community college presidents, Gail Mellow and Regina Peruggi, engaged faculty and staff throughout CUNY, spoke with experts across the nation, and reviewed a growing body of research on community colleges. Ultimately, they issued a concept paper that reflected the breadth of their expertise working with traditionally underserved and at-risk students. On October 31, 2008, the Chancellor distributed the concept paper to the University community, and it was well received by the Chancellor, CUNY's community college presidents, and national experts who served on an Advisory Board for the planning process. Input was sought from staff in the offices of Student Affairs, Enrollment Management and Financial Aid, as well as from the Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate. Further feedback was solicited from faculty and staff through public meetings scheduled at the community colleges; over 300 faculty attended.

On March 6th, the NCC project was awarded a planning grant of $560,258 from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The planning team has since hired an associate director, a senior director of the educational model, and a program assistant; a search is underway for a senior director for enrollment management. Additionally, a draft multi-level timeline/gantt chart of tasks and related milestones leading up to the opening of the college has been created. Having evaluated the majors proposed in the concept paper, the NCC team proposes moving ahead with the following twelve majors: nursing, surgical tech, medical informatics, business administration, energy services management, supply chain management, information technology, teacher (urban) education, human services, urban studies, environmental science, and liberal arts.

Future plans:

  • Raise matching funds required by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation planning grant

  • Raise additional external funds to support planning and implementation of the new community college initiative

  • Produce detailed plans for the educational model

  • Develop the staffing structure for the new community college

  • Develop start-up and 5-year operation budget models

  • Define interim space requirements for the college and identify potential space

  • Define permanent space requirements

  • Develop ongoing hiring plan for planning & implementation of the new community college

  • Make adequate progress in CUNY, NYSED, and Middle States Approval Protocols

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #9: Continue to serve the City of New York through projects and partnerships with City and State Agencies, and generate external funds to support these efforts.

Team leader: John Mogulescu

Summary:

As suggested by the goal’s title, this team strives to support New York City through multiple projects and partnerships, and seeks to obtain funding to facilitate this work.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • In 2008-2009, we raised $60.6 million to continue to serve the diverse population of New York City in the areas of K-12 education, literacy/GED preparation, health and social services, workforce development, and the arts.

  • As the training arm of the City and State, we have developed a wide variety of training programs, including but not limited to: school support for the New York City Department of Education, executive leadership training for the New York City Housing Authority, informal childcare training for the New York City Administration for Children’s Services, public authorities training for the New York State Authority Budget Office, and health workforce training for the New York State Department of Health.

  • Funding has also enabled us to begin new programs, such as Jobs Plus, a program which, in cooperation with Hostos CC, provides workforce preparation services to residents of NYCHA's Jefferson Houses in East Harlem; “We Are New York,” an innovative film project targeting New York City’s English Language Learners; the Harmony Program, which trains CUNY students to teach music in the public schools; and scholarship programs for continuing education students.

Future plans:

In addition to continuing the programs named above, in the coming months, we plan to generate new projects and additional external funding. Already, we have received $20 million in funding through the Department of Small Business Services; $3.7 million in funding for the ASAP program; and $1.3 million for a new statewide initiative called QUALITYstarsNY (QSNY), which is a rating and improvement system for early childhood services.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #10: Enhance the academic performance of SEEK/CD students.

Team leader: Cheryl Williams

Team members: Shelley Ast, David Crook, Cheryl Littman, Garrie Moore

Summary:

This team worked to enhance the academic performance of SEEK/CD students, as indicated by enhanced performance on OIRA success measures.

Progress toward success indicators:

During AY 2008-2009 OIRA data reports showed improved aggregate student performance over the previous year in 2-year retention rates and 6-year graduation rates in baccalaureate programs; higher CPE pass rates than regular admits; continued higher retention and graduation rates than regulars in CD; and more CD freshmen than regulars completing the first semester with GPA’s of 2.0 or higher.Individual Programs excelled in meeting student performance goals. Most notably, Baruch SEEK’s 6-year graduation rate was the highest in CUNY; Brooklyn SEEK was cited in the college’s Middle States report for best practices in e-portfolios, pre-freshman institutes, and preparing students for the core curriculum.

The OSP funded two proposals in SEEK that were specifically designed to improve student performance outcomes. Brooklyn SEEK received support to develop an electronic benchmarks process for freshmen and sophomores. The Brooklyn SEEK benchmarks were adopted by the college for regularly admitted freshmen. The OSP also funded a proposal submitted by the Special Programs Transfer Task Force. The project’s goal is to develop a model for seamless transfer from CD into SEEK, starting with CD into Baruch SEEK.

Future plans:

  • Provide professional development in assessment and develop an assessment model for SEEK and CD. September - charge Assessment Working Group (AWG), October-December - share program best practices at Council meetings; November - expert presenter at Fall 2010 retreat; February - review AWG progress report; May/June - final AWG report.

  • Share best practices by hosting the Special Programs biennial conference, “Tutor Talk” in April 2010 and increase participation by including other constituencies.

  • In SEEK, develop and fund projects that are designed to assist Programs meet their student performance goals. Proposal submission and review is ongoing from September through April.
  • Continue to develop the model for seamless transfer from CD into SEEK. The Transfer Task Force meets monthly and is anticipated to continue working until it develops a “Transfer Passport” for the most popular degree programs of each senior college.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 11: Increase Student Success in Math

Team leader: Lexa Logue

Team members: David Crook, Yasemin Jones, Curtis Kendrick, and Sherri Ondrus

Summary: The team has concluded that multiple factors are responsible for our many students not passing math courses. The team therefore seeks to identify where the largest blockages are for our students and the interventions that will have the most effect. Support, encouragement, information, and rewards are being used to change behavior rather than mandates.

Progress toward success indicators:

  1. College readiness in math: Analyses and policy discussions and decisions continue as part of the initiative with the DOE led (on CUNY’s part) by Senior University Dean John Mogulescu. The initiative concerns NYC public high school graduates’ college readiness.   A proposal for external funding has been recently submitted to help support this work.
  2. Further analyses of college performance: Extensive data on student performance in math courses were distributed to the CAO of each campus and to the Math Discipline Council, discussed at an academic council, and are being discussed in subsequent conversations between the CAOs and the EVC.
  3. Identification of best practices:  An annotated bibliography was compiled, posted on the web, and sent to all math faculty.
  4. Based on goal #11’s action plan, the following additional actions were taken:
    • An online student math contest was conducted by SPS involving hundreds of students.
    • Guidelines for a math faculty award were distributed.
    • An RFP for math research projects was disseminated to all math faculty; 31 letters of intent have been submitted in response.
    • An OAA staff member attended a conference on math pedagogy in California.
    • Calculators were purchased for lending by the campus libraries.
    • Maplesoft licenses were purchased centrally for use by all of the campuses.

Future Plans and Timeline:

  1. Winners of the math faculty award will be chosen and honored next fall
  2. A workshop will be held in September to help LOI authors write proposals for well-designed projects. Awards will be made later in the fall. The funded projects will be closely followed and the results applied as appropriate.
  3. OAA is exploring the possibility of having a math conference on pedagogy held at CUNY during the next year, similar to the California conference.
  4. Additional software is being investigated for possible purchase in the next year.
  5. In the next year, the placement cut points will be reexamined, with subsequent modification of those cut points as appropriate.
  6. During 10-11, we will select, train, and deploy the first 48 Quantitative Reasoning Fellows.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #12: Initiate additional online and face-to-face for-credit and noncredit postsecondary programs in SPS

Team leader: John Mogulescu

Summary:

This goal focuses on SPS program development. Success indicators include: number of programs; number of enrollments and graduates; and student and employer satisfaction with programs.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • During the 2008-2009 academic year, SPS launched new master’s degree programs in Applied Theater, Labor Studies, and Disability Studies, and new certificate programs in Health Care Policy and Administration (one advanced certificate and one undergraduate certificate). In addition, three of the five courses in the Immigration Law Advanced Certificate program were offered online for the first time.

  • Bachelor of Arts in Communication and Culture were awarded to 33 students and the Bachelor of Science in Business to the first 11 students completing their degree requirements in the Online BS in Business. SPS also awarded over 100 certificates to students completing the requirements of the Disability Studies, Immigration Law, Labor Studies, Non-Profit Fundraising, and Public Administration certificate programs during the year.

  • Enrollment in the two undergraduate online degree programs increased from 664 unduplicated students for the 2007-2008 academic year to 883 unduplicated students in the 2008-2009 academic year (a 33 percent increase). Enrollments in SPS programs (degree, non-degree, and credit courses) increased from 908 students in the 2007 fall term to 1,223 students in the 2008 fall term (a 35 percent increase). And, SPS experienced substantial growth in its portfolio of non-credit programs. Revenue from grants, contracts, and partnerships increased by 186 percent in 2008-2009 totaling more than $4 million at the end of the 2008-2009 fiscal year.

Future plans:

  • Fall 2009 - launch the Online MS in Business Management and Leadership.

  • Spring 2010 – first MA graduates (Applied Theatre and likely a few from Labor Studies and Disability Studies)

  • Fall 2009 – Murphy Institute, in partnership with Cornell’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations will launch a new Labor Relations certificate program.

  • Spring 2010 – in partnership with the Lincoln Center Institute, SPS will launch a new 12-credit online advanced certificate program in Imaginative Learning through Aesthetic Education.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #13: Performance Gaps (NASH)

Team leader: David Crook

Team members: Curtis Kendrick, Bob Ptachik, Colin Chellman, Vanessa Anderson

Summary:

Last year, CUNY joined the Access to Success (A2S) initiative, a collaboration between the National Association of System Heads (NASH) and the Education Trust to reduce the gaps in access to higher education and success rates between under-represented minority students (URMs) and non-URMs, and between low-income students and their more privileged peers. Participants in A2S have committed themselves to reducing current gaps by half by 2015. During the 2009-10 academic year, the group will extend the work begun this year by developing detailed analyses of performance gaps and sharing them with the colleges. The group will also work with the chancellery and the colleges to implement strategies for reducing access and performance gaps.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Prepare baseline reports for NASH/Ed Trust. CUNY has completed the extensive programming required for this project and has submitted the baseline data.
  • Development of data to identify opportunities for the recruitment of URM students: The policy unit has created a series of reports showing the number of college-ready URM students by high school, and rates of application, acceptance and enrollment at CUNY. Updated reports will be distributed to the Enrollment Management Council to inform recruitment for the 2009-10 academic year.
  • Creation of reports for each college showing progress in reducing achievement gaps in retention and graduation. OIRA prepared an overview presentation for the Chief Academic Officers dramatizing access and performance gaps, as well as a companion report for each college.
  • Complete papers for AIR, AERA, and AEFA detailing the inter-relationships among income, racial and gender differences in academic achievement. All 3 papers have been accepted and delivered. New papers are being developed for 2009-2010.
  • Conduct research to understand the reasons for performance gaps and to identify strategies for reducing them that have been effective at other colleges. We have begun to explore group differences in progress through remediation, and we have been developing the joint data resources of the NYC DOE and CUNY in order to operationalize college readiness and understand group differences.
  • Incorporate metrics for measuring progress on A2S into the PMP. Completed. The 2010 PMP will target reductions in URM-non-URM gaps as well as gender gaps in retention and graduation.

Future plans:

Engage the senior leadership of the University in this initiative (2009-10), identify the most promising strategies (beginning fall 2009), develop a set of intermediate metrics for measuring progress (beginning fall 2009), implement the strategies (2009-2015), track progress in monitoring reports.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #14: Promote Information Literacy System-Wide

Team leader: Curtis Kendrick

Team members: George Otte, Cheryl Littman

Summary: Promote CUNY-based research on information literacy and analyze additional data; develop specific outcome measures

Progress toward success indicators:

Migrated CUNY online information literacy tutorial to be hosted by Hostos College. Bilingual (Spanish/English) and English language versions are available. As a supplement to the online tutorial a set of quizzes were developed. The quiz questions are tailored to the CUNY-wide information literacy learning goals and objectives. When students complete the quiz their results are sent to their professor via email. In addition, the quiz results can be accessed by CUNY instruction coordinators if they wish to analyze results for students at their campus. Two Library Information Literacy Advisory Committee (LILAC) members have been appointed to the CPE Advisory Board. Results of the Hostos Information Literacy Study have been disseminated and analyzed. This longitudinal study compared a group of students taking information literacy to a control group. The data indicate that students who participated in the Hostos IL program stay in school longer, accumulate more credits and graduate sooner. The pass rates on all key tests are equally as promising, indicating the positive impact of IL instruction on student success. Following the work of the Hostos Study, OIRA was asked to compile data on student performance at campuses where information literacy is offered as a for credit course. Test and control groups were defined for students at Baruch, Hunter, Queens, LaGuardia, and Medgar Evers. The data suggest that students who take for-credit information literacy courses have a higher success rate than their peers who do not. Eleven campuses received a Collaborative Research Incentive Grant. The purpose of the grant was to administer the iskills tm test to gather data on students’ information, communications and technical proficiencies. The iskills test was administered to 572 CUNY students. While student scores are similar to scores for non-CUNY students, the scores indicate an overall need for improvement in information, communications and technical skills. LILAC has established a presence on the new Academic Commons and has compiled an annotated list of assessment tools, including rubrics, to be used in assessing information literacy.

Future plans:

Investigate SAILS as an alternative assessment vehicle for information literacy; Work on extending the CUNY-wide information literacy learning objectives from 60 credits to 120 credits; Continue to develop tutorial quiz questions tailored to the LILAC Learning Goals and Objectives; Create assessment rubrics for students, with at least 45 to 60 credits, to evaluate papers across the curriculum and CUNY campuses; Redesign the information literacy website and launch a public relations campaign to promote information literacy at CUNY.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #15: Assess remediation and improve remedial instruction.

Team leader: David Crook.

Team members: Lexa Logue, Judith Summerfield, Tracy Meade, Sherri Ondrus, Yasemin Jones

Summary:

This multi-year project will orchestrate assessment and improvement of remedial instruction at CUNY. The group will undertake extensive research, identify promising practices at the campuses, assess selected innovations in collaboration with external researchers, disseminate information about teaching and learning in developmental education, and improve communication with high schools about college readiness and CUNY’s admission standards.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Develop quantitative information about remedial sequences. Work continues on reports showing remedial sequences and success rates in English and math. Spring and summer 2009.

  • Identify promising practices and programs in developmental education at the colleges. We developed and administered a survey of promising remedial practices at the community colleges and selected comprehensive colleges. A brief report is in preparation.

  • Design rigorous research on remediation at CUNY. A panel of experts, including Tom Bailey, Director of the Community College Research Center, Teachers College Columbia University; LaShawn Richburg-Hayes of MDRC; and Paul Attewell, of the Graduate Center, assisted OAA in formulating a set of research questions. This work eventually led to a collaboration with MDRC to assess the ASAP+ program. Paul Attewell has completed a series of studies identifying positive effects of mathematics and writing remediation for non-ESL students but not for ESL students. We have been included in a Gates-funded CCRC study of the effectiveness of assessment tools in placing students in remedial sequences and have begun to plan the analyses.

  • Review CUNY’s policies on remediation and recommend changes where appropriate. The group focused its review on exit testing policies in mathematics and familiarized itself with remedial policies in general. Plans for next year include formation of a CUNY-wide assessment advisory council.

  • Disseminate promising practices. Discussions are under way with the new leadership of the Office of Undergraduate Education on how best to accomplish.

  • Communication about College Readiness. Group members have been active in the College Readiness Initiative in collaboration with the NYC Department of Education. A key strand of this initiative is research to better define college readiness and improved strategies for outreach to students, parents and teachers.

Future plans:

In this multi-year effort, the group will next continue to conduct the research and assessment activities, communicate results to the colleges, and build momentum for innovation in remedial instruction at the University.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 16: Begin to increase retention of CUNY graduates in the teaching profession in NYC high-need schools.

Team leader: Jane Ashdown

Team members: David Crook/ Cheryl Littman

Summary: Currently, CUNY schools and divisions of education have little information regarding where their teacher education graduates are teaching and how long they stay teaching, except as they maintain contact with their own alumni. More systematic data are needed. CUNY does not have direct access to NYS teacher employment data. However, the New York State Teacher Quality Research Center (TQRC) pilot has been established at SUNY, Albany with funding from NYSED and the Carnegie Foundation. The outcome of this development will be institution specific reports tracking cohorts of “program completers” from 2000-2003 into the teaching profession. These reports were planned for delivery in November, but now are scheduled for later this spring. Cheryl Littman and Jane Ashdown have served on the Advisory Panel for TQRC.

Data will be available to OIRA as well as individual campuses. Once campuses have received the reports, we can work with campus teacher education deans and chairs on a careful analysis of these data in order to establish current retention rates for graduates of CUNY’s teacher education programs and identify where and how we might improve those rates. The TQRC plans to survey institutions to determine how they have made or plan to make use of the program reports and data files. The examination of data by Deans and chairs will be one part of our response.

Progress toward success indicators (as of May 22, 2009):

According to staff at the Teacher Quality Research Center all CUNY teacher education campuses (with the exception of NYCCT) have received and downloaded their reports. Cheryl Littman at OIRA has an electronic master file of these reports and is preparing hard copies for the campus files at the Office of Academic Affairs.

Future plans:

Work on this goal will continue under the leadership of Interim University Dean for Academic Affairs (Teacher Education) Joan Lucariello in 2009-2010 (please see updated OAA goals chart at http://web.cuny.edu/academics/oaa/goals.html).

Back to Goals Chart »



Goal # 17: Enhance program data: Teacher Education

Team leader (2008-09): Jane Ashdown

Team members: David Crook/Cheryl Littman

Summary:

This team worked toward publishing a Teacher Education Data Book (TEDB). Work began in July 2008 with a meeting of Education Deans and Chairs along with campus directors of assessment and accountability. At that meeting, Cheryl Littman and David Crook presented a series of unpopulated tables for review in terms of what could be helpful in informing practices in teacher education programs. In fall 2008, the Teacher Education Council reviewed a further set of tables and began a discussion about campus level data that might be included in a TEBD.

Progress toward the success indicator (as of May 22, 2009):

Progress has been slow. A significant factor impeding efforts is ensuring the reliability of the data. In order to improve the quality of the teacher education data campuses must engage in formally terminating and de-registering obsolete teacher education programs. To this end, campuses have received a custom analysis of programs that need to go through this process. A further effort in this regard is being undertaken at the time of writing. Another factor is SIP coding that is in use for teacher education at the campus level, but does not flag students appropriately for OIRA analysis. Going forward, the team’s spring semester strategy is to focus on cleaning up the data and where necessary make visits to individual campuses to meet with the campus Dean/Chair and the Registrar. A team planning meeting to move this process forward was held on Friday January 30th and included Mark Cassaza, Director of Academic Information. Cheryl Littman and Mark Casazza will attend an upcoming Registrar’s Council meeting and seek feedback from the Council on the possibility of moving students into currently registered teacher education programs and on restricting registration in inactive programs. There has not been any further progress regarding this goal except for discussions with OIRA about reducing the scope of this project to better fit with available resources in OIRA.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #18: Revise and increase options for preparing math and science teachers

Team leader (2008-09): Jane Ashdown

Team members: University Working Group: Anthony Rini, Burt Sacks, David Steiner, Michael Gillespie, Sandra Peskin, Christine Mangino, Deborah Eldridge, Deborah Shanley, Al Posamentier, Gabriela Fighetti (to 1/12/09), Gail Simmons, Maura Donnelly.

Summary:

The University Working group (WG) worked toward formulating options for the chancellery’s consideration.

Progress toward success indicators:

The WG’s report was completed in February 2009 and may be accessed at http://web.cuny.edu/academics/oaa/acr/UniversityWorkGroupReport.pdf <pdf>.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #19: Teacher Academy (current students) (TA)

Team leader (2008-09): Jane Ashdown

Team members: Maura Donnelly, Anthony Rini, Michael Corrente and Andrea Baker.

Summary:

This team worked to ensure that students receive what has been promised, as well as receive an effective education.

Progress toward success indicators (as of May 22, 2009):

Our application for a fourth year of continuation funding for the six core Teacher Academy campuses has been unsuccessful. However, the Petrie Foundation is interested in working with two campuses, Hunter and Lehman. Meanwhile the Teacher Academy proceeds with increasing support from campuses and in some cases substantial external funds. It seems likely that CSI will receive a Noyce Foundation grant. A potential consortium between Lehman, Brooklyn and Hunter may seek funding for the Teacher Academy through the Teacher Quality Partnership grant.

Future plans:

Please visit the 2009-2010 OAA Goals Chart (http://web.cuny.edu/academics/oaa/goals.html) for information on preparing teachers for high-need instruction areas going forward.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 20: Enhance program data: Nursing

Team leader: William Ebenstein

Team members: David Crook, Cheryl Littman

Summary:

The team is working toward the dissemination of an annual “data book.”

Progress toward success indicators:

An interdisciplinary health workforce research team has been formed in the Office of the University Dean. It collects, analyzes and disseminates data from the Institutional Research Database (IRDB), the NYS Education Department Office of the Professions, and other sources, on an ongoing basis. Reports on AAS and generic BS nurse graduates, projected enrollments in BS completion programs, and patterns of enrollment and graduation of incumbent health workers have been completed. Data were also used to inform successful grant applications that were submitted to the NYC SBS and City Council and to aid in presentations to State lawmakers, local and regional stakeholders, and academic groups. Data were also used to help design changes in the way the University classifies students who are interested in nursing as a major. University-wide and college specific data on nursing enrollment, retention, graduation, licensing pass rates, demographics, employment, earnings and other topics were routinely disseminated through the Nursing Discipline Council and shared during individual campus visits.

Future plans:

A “data book” is being prepared for the October Nursing Discipline Council.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 21: Enhance the use of technology in nurse education

Team leader: William Ebenstein

Team members: David Crook, Cheryl Littman, George Otte, Robert Ptachik, Anthony Rini

Summary:

The team is working to increase capacity in nursing simulation, integrate electronic health records into the curriculum, increase use of eportfolios and increase the number of online courses.

Progress toward success indicators:

With funding and support through the Office of the University Dean:

  • Additional equipment has been purchased and installed and nursing simulation labs have been built or expanded at LaGuardia Community College, CUNY-on-the-Concourse, and Kingsborough Community College.

  • Faculty at Hunter College and Borough of Manhattan Community College attended national conferences and training workshops in simulation.

  • Faculty at LaGuardia Community College, Queensborough Community College and Hunter College participated in a regional training program to integrate eportfolios into their nursing curriculums.

  • Lehman College is recruiting AAS nurses at SVCMC and NY Hospital Queens for their on-site BS completion program which incorporates distance learning courses into the curriculum.

  • NYCCT and Hunter are piloting projects that integrate electronic health records into their nursing curriculums.

In addition, the Office of the University Dean has entered into discussions with the Greater New York Hospital Association to synchronize efforts in the area of electronic health records. Also, the City Council has provided $246,000 in the upcoming year to expand the simulation lab at CUNY-on-the-Concourse in partnership with the healthcare industry and its unions.

Future plans:

These projects and other initiatives in the area of technology and nurse education will be supported and monitored. A “Technology and Nurse Education” subcommittee of the Nursing Discipline Council is being re-convened in the fall 2009 semester

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 22: Improve clinical competencies in nurse education

Team leader: William Ebenstein

Team member: Sherri Ondrus

Summary:

The team is working to develop partnerships with health providers to implement nationally recognized “best practices” in clinical experiences, and develop evaluation methods to measure competencies.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • As part of the affiliation that has developed with Lehman College, BMCC and Saint Vincent’s Catholic Medical Centers (SVCMC), hospital preceptors will receive training in August 2009 to work closely with CUNY clinical instructors to provide mentoring to CUNY nursing students starting this fall 2009 semester. They will participate in a new initiative that is being piloted by BMCC to provide a more intensive clinical experience, which will include specialty rotations in the emergency room and critical care units. An evaluation tool is also being developed.

  • LaGuardia Community College successfully integrated video clips that depict basic clinical competencies by nursing students within the simulation lab environment, into the eportfolios of these students. In fall 2009 that will continue to develop these technologies as a way to demonstrate a broader range of clinical competencies.

Future plans:

These projects and other new initiatives in this area will be monitored and supported.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal # 23: Steer students to appropriate health careers

Team leader: William Ebenstein

Team members: Robert Ptachik, Julia Wrigley, David Crook, Cheryl Littman

Summary:

The team is working toward implementation of a new admission requirement for nursing and respiratory therapy, and a new undeclared health major, along with appropriate advising.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • A change in nursing admissions requirements related to immigration status was implemented in fall 2008; a plan to extend this change to respiratory therapy is being developed.

  • CUNY received approval from the SED Office of the Professions to implement the undeclared health major. A plan to implement it for students interested in nursing by fall 2010 is being designed.

Future plans:

  • BMCC will continue to develop a plan to extend the new policy related to undocumented students to its respiratory therapy program.

  • Central Office of Academic Affairs staff (enrollment management, UAPC, admissions, institutional research) will develop technical procedures to implement the undeclared health major. The University Dean will work with the campuses to implement it and improve academic advisement for this group of students.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #24: Articulation and Transfer

Team leader: Julia Wrigley

Team members: Nancy Aries, Lisa Beatha, David Crook, Bill Ebenstein, Cheryl Littman, Garrie Moore, Bob Ptachik, Ekaterina Sukhanova, Cheryl Williams.

Summary:

This group is working to assess scope and nature of transfer problems in CUNY; conduct an audit of the proportion of credits presented by transfer students accepted by senior colleges; and analyze reasons some transfer students graduate with excess credits.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Transfer audit. OIRA provided data for a transfer audit. The goal in this round was to establish how many transfer students graduated with excess credits (more than 120) and how many “native” students did so. The most notable finding was that many students, whether they graduated from the college they started at or were transfer students, graduated with more than 120 credits. Surprisingly, students who transferred in without degrees were less likely to accumulate excess credits than those who transferred in with degrees. Of transfer students who graduated from CUNY senior colleges in 2007-08, 40.7 percent who came in with degrees graduated with more than 130 credits compared to 34.7 percent of those who transferred in without an associate degree. Many “native” students also graduated with excess credits: 28.2 percent graduated with over 130 credits in 07-08.

  • The proportion of students who graduated with more than 125 credits is high: 44.5 percent of native students, 55.4 percent of transfer students who came in with degrees, and 50 percent of transfer students who entered without degrees.

  • Programs requiring more than 120 credits. Some CUNY programs require more than 120 credits so our next task was to assess how many of the graduates with excess credits might have been in such programs (e.g., accounting, public administration, architecture, biomedical science, engineering programs, and several medical technology programs). Programs requiring more than 120 credits graduated 2,169 students in 07-08, accounting for roughly a quarter of graduates with excess credits.

Future plans:

  • We don’t yet know why so many students (native and transfer) graduate with more credits than required by their programs, but figures are quite variable by college and transfer status. We will analyze the data by program, as this may have an effect over and above requirements of some programs for more than 120 credits, and will also look at the effects of changes in major.

  • We will also initiate several focus groups of transfer students at senior colleges to ascertain their experiences with advising, transfer credit evaluation, course availability, and entries into majors, with the goal of understanding possible barriers from a student perspective.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #25: Continue to develop the CUNY Leadership Academy (CLA)

Team leader: Garrie Moore

Team members: Joe-Joe McManus, Christina Joseph, Julie Agosto, Judith Summerfield, Cheryl Williams

Summary:

Connected with developing the CLA, this team is also working to increase the numbers of students utilizing co-curricular transcripts and involved in mentoring opportunities; increase the organizations recognizing the co-curricular transcript as part of a job candidate’s resume; and increase the students involved in service learning opportunities.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Co-curricular transcripts: The capacity to offer CUNY students co-curricular transcripts (or equivalent options) is available to all campuses using a variety of methods of delivery. Optimal Resume software, which features the ability to develop e-portfolios, is an available option on all campuses through the Career Centers. Additionally, various campuses are using software packages (OrgSync, CollegiateLink, Symplicity, or in-house software in the case of KBCC) to provide official and/or un-official co-curricular transcripts.

  • Mentoring: The Academy continues to provide mentoring for the “graduating class” of CLA Fellows in accordance with their individualized professional development plans; the Academy is in the process of selecting the 09-10 class of CLA Fellows, all of whom will receive individualized, leadership-centered professional development.. Christina Joseph, CLA Coordinator of Special Programs and Professional Development, is compiling a database of mentoring programs at CUNY.

  • Service learning: CUNY Corps, the CLA service program, was launched at a press conference with Mayor Bloomberg. Research is underway to compile a database of all existing service learning and community service programs at CUNY. The CLA Fellows are working on their service project which includes the development of a mechanism to support future projects led by CLA Fellows and Alumni.

  • CLA: Overall development continues, focusing on the overall CLA structure and means of collaboration with campus programs, CUNY-wide program descriptions, research, theoretical framework and assessment model, goals, and institutional advancement.

Future plans:

  • Co-curricular transcripts: Training and development will continue with offices of Student Life and Career Services to encourage multiple campuses to offer co-curricular by Spring 2010. The CLA will provide support to promote the use of co-curricular transcripts, based on the unique needs of each campus. Support may include funding for verification of co-curricular transcripts, promotion of services, training, etc.

  • Mentoring: The CLA will complete research on existing mentoring & service learning programs at CUNY. CLA will determine the best means to support existing mentoring programs, act as a clearinghouse, and promote cross-pollination.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #26: Enhance first-year programs

Team leader: Judith Summerfield

Team members: Yasemin Jones, Erin Martineau, Linda Bernstein (free lance writer)

Summary:

This team worked to identify first-year resources and best practices and make recommendations for implementation for the campuses.

Progress toward success indicators:

Completed comprehensive analysis of CUNY’s senior, comprehensive and community college first-year program structures.

Future plans:

Going forward, the enhancement of first-year programs will be folded within a broader goal to improve the accountability of CUE programs, under the leadership of Interim University Dean for Undergraduate Education Nancy Aries.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #27: Enrollment management

Team leader: Bob Ptachik

Team member: David Crook

Summary:

The enrollment management environment at the City University underwent a major change during the 2008-09 academic year. For the last several years, the major focus at CUNY was on increasing enrollment, while maintaining or improving the academic profiles of our baccalaureate institutions. Except in a very few cases, our colleges had sufficient resources to absorb more students.

Increased interest in CUNY as a first option for high school students has resulted from a number of highly visible academic achievements; the very public accomplishments of CUNY students; the lure of New York City as the most popular college town in the country; economic uncertainty: and the high cost of private education. All of these factors have led to increased pressure on the enrollment management system. As of early August 2009, more than 86,000 freshmen and transfer students had been admitted to our colleges for fall 2009, an increase of over 15 percent compared to last year.

The challenge now for the enrollment management group at CUNY is how to continue to maximize access to our colleges, while ensuring that every student who is offered admission can be assured of an appropriate set of experiences to help effect the transition to college. More specifically, this means that fewer and fewer colleges will be able to provide “on demand” admission even to fully qualified applicants. Some community colleges have had to stop admitting students well before the start of the new semester, and baccalaureate programs continue to become more selective.

Progress toward success indicators and future plans:

  • Even with the dramatically increased number of applicants, UAPC was able to process applications much more quickly than last year.

  • The application submission process is now essentially fully web-based. While a very small number of students use the paper application, almost all freshmen and transfer applicants utilize the on-line application. The transition from one-third on-line to fully on-line took only two years.

  • CUNY has taken the first small steps in implementing a customer relations management system (Hobson’s EMT). Hunter College and the Office of Admission Services have taken the lead in this effort, while all undergraduate campuses have started implementation. The major hole in the system is the inability to include applicant data on the system as a result of some technical data issues. If we can reach accommodation with Hobson’s, this tool will become much more valuable.

  • The Office of Admission Services continues to make changes in the senior staff, with the intent of focusing more on the use of technology in recruiting students.

  • Discussions continue about the extent and timing of the implementation of admissions as part of CUNYfirst.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #28: Maintain special SPS programs that provide support to particular NYC populations

Team leader: John Mogulescu

Summary: SPS develops and maintains training programs for specific populations.

Progress toward success indicators (which vary according to the program):

  • New York City Housing Authority Executive Leadership Academy provided a professional development program for a select group of NYCHA Department Directors.

  • CUNY Fundraising Academy provided 102 CUNY staff with a professional development program to strengthen the ability of CUNY to achieve its ambitious development goals.

  • Practical Project Management course provided to 28 CUNY employees to support the implementation of CUNY First.

  • Department of Citywide Administrative Services Practical Project Management provided 26 DCAS employees with SPS’s Practical Project Management training program.

  • Department of Citywide Administrative Services Energy Services and Management Training provided 50 DCAS employees who manage energy services projects (or who are expected to manage energy services projects) within the New York City government with two courses focused on energy conservation.

  • Financial Literacy Train-the-Trainer provided 65 newly hired financial counselors, Financial Education Network Partners, and Department of Consumer Affairs staff with a curriculum and materials for training financial counselors.

  • Coastal Storm Plan Personnel Training Program provided 1,186 city employees with training to prepare them to staff emergency shelters in the event of a severe storm.

  • Public Authorities Director Training provided executive-level training in good governance and fiscal oversight practices for 232 members of boards of directors of New York State Public Authorities.

  • Office of Child Support Enforcement Training Program launched the first courses in a series of courses that are part of a comprehensive learning program for 800+ employees and vendors of the OCSE.

Future plans:

  • NYC Office of Emergency Management Sahana Project, a new project to help build a software program capable of managing key functions of large scale emergency sheltering

  • Continue rolling out Office of Child Support Enforcement Training Program courses

  • Continue the Public Authorities Director Training, DCAS Energy Services Training, and Coastal Storm Plan Personnel Training

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #29: PSC Student Mentoring Project

Team leader: Garrie Moore

Team members: Lexa Logue, Pamela Silverblatt, Judith Summerfield, Laura Blank, Barbara Bowen and appointed staff.

Summary:

This team is working to have the proposed project ready for implementation. Pamela Silverblatt is taking the lead for management. Barbara Bowen provided background, pointing to her experience at Queens College in what is now called the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program. The intent of this program is to encourage students with a demonstrated commitment to excellence and equity in higher education to pursue the Ph.D. in core fields in the Humanities and Sciences. Queens is a leading participant in this national project.

Progress toward success indicators:

The committee discussed issues to consider in developing a pilot: suggestion to create pilots in four colleges (two senior and two community colleges); address needs of first-year students and the retention problem; faculty would mentor groups of freshmen; help them choose major. Barbara was to approach Mellon Foundation for grant possibilities. Question of faculty compensation raised; Pamela said that we should consider financial remuneration and not course release.

Central Office members of the team met during the spring 2009 semester to follow up on information and action items.

Members of the Central Office of Student Affairs (COSA) met in May 2009 to propose ways in which there might be synergies between the PSC Student Mentoring Project, the CUNY Student Financial Aid Initiative in general, and the “CUNY Work Study” and “Hunger & Homelessness” financial aid programs in particular.

Future plans:

  • Going forward, the OAA leader on this goal will be Interim University Dean for Undergraduate Education Nancy Aries.

  • The team will more fully develop the prospect of a pilot project involving two senior and two community colleges.

  • Foundation opportunities to support this project will be more fully explored.

  • The University will more fully consider faculty compensation options related to participation in this project.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #30: Coordinating academic support services (admissions, bursar, financial aid, and registrar)

Team leader: Garrie Moore

Team members: Bob Ptachik, Judith Summerfield, Christopher Rosa

Summary:

This work of this group seeks to increase student satisfaction ratings; identify best practices; and assess and increase the number of campuses using the best practices.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • This group is in the process of conducting an analysis of current student support services at CUNY and benchmarking best practices, including identifying student-to-staff ratios in key student service areas recommended by the Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS), and professional organizations associated with key student service areas. CUNY has engaged in a review of its counseling and advising resources through a self-study of its campus counseling centers and its SEEK/CD programs facilitated by Keeling & Associates.

  • The team is engaged in a review of OIR Student Satisfaction Survey Results for past four years.

Future plans:

Going forward, this team will be led by University Dean for Executive Office and Enrollment Management Robert Ptachik. Plans include an inventory of the existence and functions of BARFIT (bursar, registrar, financial aid, IT) groups on CUNY campuses as a means to coordinate academic support services. At colleges where such groups do not exist, the team will work with senior administrators to help in their establishment.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #31: Establish a staff development initiative for Student Affairs

Team leader: Garrie Moore

Team members: Zina Richardson, Christina Joseph

Summary:

This team will investigate and enhance professional development for student affairs staff.

Progress toward success indicators:

Students: individual professional development meetings conducted with Academy Fellows; Specific professional development summaries and recommendations shared with students (ongoing); individualized, comprehensive career readiness and professional development provided to more than 1,400 students with disabilities via the CUNY LEADS Project

COSA Staff: meetings of CUNY’s Student Affairs Professional Development team (Spring 2009).

Division of Student Affairs: CUNY Veterans Affairs Conference, hosted by Medgar Evers College, offered CUNY veterans services staff professional development around core competencies in the support of transition, retention, and success of student veterans & reservists (April 2009); CUNY “Hidden Client Conference,” hosted by the Hunter School of Social Work and sponsored by Project PROVE, offered CUNY student affairs professionals training in serving student veterans and reservists with mental health issues, including PTSD (May 2009); CUNY Committee on Student Disability Issues (COSDI) hosts a one day capacity building conference for CUNY disability services professionals on best practices in postsecondary disability services (July 2009); he CUNY Mental Health & Wellness Initiative offered a day-long advanced training for CUNY counseling professionals on Titanium case management software (May 2009); the CUNY Mental Health & Wellness Initiative sponsored a one-day training for University professionals on “Managing Aggressive Behavior”.

Future plans:

Tbd, pending appointment of a new Vice Chancellor for Student Development.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #32: Design a PMP Information Website

Team leader: Sherri Ondrus

Team members: Cheryl Littman, Jordan Rome

Summary:

This team worked toward developing a PMP information website that provides campuses with information about the PMP process, deadlines, assistance with PMP submissions, and access to the most up-to-date documents for the submissions.

Progress toward success indicators:

We created a website shortcut to the current PMP information online: www.cuny.edu/pmp. This was done to make it easy to find the site. The direct link is available on the Chancellor’s main page: http://web.cuny.edu/administration/chancellor.html

We worked with OIRA to compile the data documentation for all quantitative indicators that OIRA calculates. The documentation indicates the objective for which the indicator is calculated (#1-#9), the variable name, the way in which it is calculated, and whether it is a main or context indicator. The site now includes downloadable PDFs of program review forms and the University Goals and Targets. We will be updating the site at least once per semester.

The updated site contains Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the PMP. Information includes:

  • purpose of the PMP

  • the nine objectives

  • timelines/deadlines

  • a PowerPoint presentation with a description of the PMP

  • where to find campus data (link to WWW.OIRA.CUNY.EDU)

  • what data are included in the PMP

  • how the OIRA indicators are calculated (with a link to an Excel file with data documentation)

  • forms

  • basic information about the PMP Review Team and process

With this progress, the goal has been achieved.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #33: Middle States Standard 14 (Assessment of Student Learning)

Team leader: Sherri Ondrus

Team members: Julia Wrigley, Curtis Kendrick, Cheryl Littman, Bob Ptachik, Mahlet Tsegaye

Summary:

The working group focused on ways in which the Central Office of Academic Affairs could support the campuses regarding assessment of student learning.

Progress toward success indicators:

We invited Middle States VP Linda Suskie to 80th Street to discuss various implementation strategies for large systems like CUNY. The notes from her visit were sent to CAOs and other senior staff. As a result of this meeting, Middle States has asked CUNY’s Central Office to collaborate with them regarding accreditation matters.

By conducting a needs assessment of the CAOs to determine how the working group could best support them, we learned that the CAOs wanted to hear about the Middle States site visits at the other campuses. Therefore, in June we conducted a debriefing meeting with representatives from campuses which recently had Middle States site visits. We documented their experiences and recommendations and wrote a summary. The key findings and suggestions were distributed on the CAO listserv and posted on the CAO portion of the OAA web site.

The working group facilitated a discussion about assessment of student learning at the 2/4/09CAO meeting. Three CAOs presented their experiences (Drs. Griffith, Katopes and McCarthy). We will continue to organize CAO presentations at future CAO meetings so we can learn from one another.

The working group created a basic assessment website (http://web.cuny.edu/academics/info-central/academic-resources/assessment.html) with links to campus assessment sites and assessment resources. On the site we posted a list of selected readings recommended by Linda Suskie during her visit (some of these articles have PDF links). Several articles and assessment resources such as those from the Middle States Commission on Higher Education are also accessible as PDFs. We compiled and distributed a list of national and regional assessment conferences and also posted those on the web site. http://web.cuny.edu/academics/info-central/academic-resources/assessment/AssessmentConferences2009.pdf <pdf>

Future plans and timeline:

To provide professional development and encourage University-wide discussion about assessment, we organized three assessment workshops. They will be held at the Macaulay Honors College. (9:30am to noon). To attend, RSVP to OAAevents@mail.cuny.edu.

  • September 25 - “A Road Map for Designing Program Level Assessment of Student Learning”

  • October 9 – “Content Analysis as a Tool for Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes”

  • November 20 – “Using Assessment to Im(Prove) Student Learning”

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #34: With CUE leaders develop and implement evaluation tools in order to measure the effectiveness of CUE programs.

Team leader: Judith Summerfield

Team members: Yasemin Jones, Erin Martineau, Julia Wrigley, Sherri Ondrus, Anthony Rini

Summary:

This team worked to produce annual outcome measures, used formatively in CUE planning and in 09-10 CUE allocations.

Progress toward success indicators:

Goal 34 was modified mid-year by OAA, and was rewritten for next year’s goals.

Result is change of old RFP process. New format has two parts: 1) report on last year’s CUE expenditures and 2) evidence of effective practices in self-selected CUE programs. Reports turned in May 22, 2009, with new CUE funding formula to be instituted as a “block grant” based on enrollment and history. Allocations not based this year on outcome measures, but rather on enrollment and past history.

Creation of new RFP called CUE Innovation Grants for 2009-2010 to adopt or adapt nationally researched best practices in higher education, submissions due June 15th.

Future plans:

Please consult the OAA Goals Chart for 2009-2010.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #35: Effect Academic Affairs Sections of CUNYfirst

Team leader: Bob Ptachik

Team members: Jane Ashdown, Annamarie Bianco, David Crook, Curtis Kendrick

Summary:

This past year has been one of slow progress towards implementing the Campus Solutions module of CUNYfirst.

Progress toward success indicators and future plans:

  • Implementation of Campus Solutions for Queens and Queensborough is currently scheduled for February /March of 2010. The two campuses are well-prepared and have made significant progress in cleaning the academic data needed to start the system.

  • Course catalogs have been converted for all CUNY schools, a necessary pre-requisite for converting teaching load analysis away from the CUPS system to CUNYfirst.

  • Discussion continues concerning the most appropriate way of implementing financial aid at CUNY. Analysis this year highlighted the complexity of this conversion.

  • Preliminary discussions continue about the path to moving CUNY admissions processing away from legacy systems to a CUNYfirst environment. There are four components to the system; a customer relations management system; an on-line intelligent CUNY-wide admissions application; an admissions database available for query and update by the colleges; and a decision engine capable of managing CUNY’s large number of program rules and requirements.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #36: Effect prioritized OAA tech projects with CIS

Team leader: George Otte

Team members: David Crook, Curtis Kendrick, John Mogulescu, Robert Ptachik

Summary:

This team worked to establish inventory or projects, and establish mechanisms for prioritizing OAA tech projects that OAA members judge effective

Progress toward success indicators:

  • A survey established a general inventory of tech projects and needs.

  • Technology priorities lists were presented and reviewed at OAA Senior Staff meetings.

  • These same lists were presented, once reviewed, to CIS Senior Staff for discussion.

  • Individual interviews with OAA Senior Staff and their designees were conducted to review technology priorities in some detail.

  • A report on the results of these interviews was made to the Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost.

Plans for AY 2009-10:

Progress towards this goal is now the purview of the Computer Change Control Committee (C4). That committee meets regularly to review approved projects and new change requests. New projects or tasks requested by OAA staff, filed with the appropriate change request form, are first reviewed by this goal’s team leader and then presented, along with recommendations, to Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost as a member of the Computer Change Control Committee.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #37: Enhance technology skills of OAA members

Team leader: George Otte

Team member: Curtis Kendrick

Summary:

This team worked to ensure that OAA members gained additional skills that they judge as useful.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • OAA Senior Staff were surveyed on their technology needs and priorities.

  • Individual interviews with OAA Senior Staff and their designees were scheduled and conducted.

Plans for AY 2009-10:

It was determined that the technology skills of OAA staff were, according to OAA Senior Staff, adequate to fulfill current needs. Any exceptions can be addressed by resources made available through CUNY’s Professional Development and Learning Management Office, particularly its Technology Training arm.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #38: Establish an Academic Commons

Team leader: George Otte

Team member: Curtis Kendrick

Summary:

This team worked toward showcasing effective practices, creating a test bed for pilots, and involving a number of participants

Prrogress toward success indicators:

  • The Academic Commons (AC) subcommittee established as part of the Committee on Academic Technology (CAT – see the report for Goal #39).

  • A faculty-led group of technology fellows researched national and international sites using the idea of an academic commons or digital commons; results were presented at the CUNY IT Conference in early December.

  • A mission statement for the CUNY Academic Commons was developed, placed in a wiki for collaborative edits, and approved.

  • The AC subcommittee narrowed possible platforms to Plone, Drupal, and WordPress Multi-user; it opted for WordPressMU in combination with MediaWiki.

  • A wireframes design (i.e., a kind of blueprint of the AC) was presented at the January meeting of CAT.

  • Server space was secured for the AC at the Graduate Center.

  • A beta version of the Commons was built and continues to be prepped for the general release; in the meantime it has over 100 users and two dozen groups; these are already realizing the goals for the Commons, as are the resources in the Commons Wiki.

  • A presentation on the CUNY Academic Commons was made at the Sloan-C International Symposium on Emerging Technology Applications in Online Learning (June 17-19 in San Francisco).

  • Funding made possible the build-out of the AC infrastructure to the tune of 16 virtual servers and a backup and recovery system. The Commons is now fully scalable, and further funding (all from OAA) will ensure the necessary oversight and maintenance.

Future plans:

  • The CUNY Academic Commons will move to general release to the CUNY community in September.

  • Announcements at various levels and in various venues will make this widely known.

  • Widespread participation, facilitated and mentored by the members of CAT, should give academic technology resources and effective practices high visibility and transparency.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #39: Establish an effective Committee on Academic Technology

Team leader: George Otte

Team member: Ann Kirschner

Summary: This team worked toward establishing a committee and effecting several significant improvements.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Appointment by CAOs of campus representatives established at the start of the year

  • First CAT meeting (with charge from EVC Logue) in September

  • An online site and a schedule of monthly meetings for CAT established by early October

  • A survey of priorities and a subsequent survey weighting these completed by November

  • The establishment of four subcommittees based on these surveys:

  • A Blackboard subcommittee (especially focused on the migration to Bb 8)

  • An Academic Commons subcommittee (see progress report for Goal #38)

  • An Eportfolio subcommittee

  • A Standards & Practices subcommittee (re online teaching and learning)

  • Much work has been done by each subcommittee, meeting monthly (and, in the case of the Blackboard subcommittee, twice monthly), reporting out at the monthly meetings for the Committee on Academic Technology:

  • The Blackboard subcommittee worked with CIS before the migration of most campuses to Blackboard 8 and still more extensively after bouts of downtime during the spring term, clarifying issues, recommending strategies (not least of all communication strategies), helping to plan and test the eventual move to a hosted solution, continuing to monitor performance and progress throughout the summer.

  • The Academic Commons subcommittee, after careful platform review and initial planning, built a beta version of the CUNY Academic Commons. (For more detail see the year-end report on Goal #38.)

  • Both the Eportfolio subcommittee and the Standards & Practices subcommittee developed and conducted surveys on where the various campuses were with eportfolio and online instruction practices and procedures.

Future plans:

  • The Eportfolio subcommittee hopes to facilitate interoperability of the various eportfolio solutions and approaches, and thereby to improve assessment and articulation.

  • The Standards & Practices subcommittee hopes to establish effective practices for online instruction and attendant procedures (course observation, course evaluation, etc.).

  • The Blackboard subcommittee hopes to continue working with CIS to improve Blackboard use, access, and reliability, and also to look into alternatives to Blackboard.

  • The Academic Commons subcommittee hopes to make work with academic technology highly visible and share-able through full release and build-out of the Commons.

  • The full Committee on Academic Technology hopes to move beyond inventorying and troubleshooting to being more forward-looking about uses of academic technology.

Comments and questions may be directed to George Otte at George.Otte@mail.cuny.edu.


Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #40: Increase use of technology in the libraries

Team leader: Curtis Kendrick;

Team members: George Otte, Dean Bryan

Summary: This team worked to effect an upgrade to Aleph version 18, issue an RFP for Electronic Resource Management System, and design library interface for Blackboard.

Progress toward Success Indicators:

  • OLS worked with CIS and Ex Libris (vendor) to upgrade Aleph. Unrelated to the upgrade, a system crash demonstrated that procedures in place for restoring the system were not effective. Since then CIS has developed a disk-based backup system of the production database. This back up was successfully used to create a copy of the production database on a test database. While the back up occurred within a reasonable amount of time (2 hours), it did not include any of the system application files nor the other configuration work changes made daily by OLS staff and staff at the campuses.

  • The University Librarian consulted with Blackboard 8 designers to make sure that every campus would be able to have a link to home page for their campus library on their Bb8 site. The CUNY Procurement Office has been working on writing a Request for Proposal for an Electronic Resources Management System (ERMS) since spring 2008.

  • OLS filled two vacancies during the year, Director of Library Systems and Systems Librarian. Recruitment for a vacancy that occurred during the year is underway. OLS has been encouraging CIS to move forward with recruiting for two critical vacancies within CIS to provide technical support to the library systems. [Note: CIS determined that they did not have funds for both positions so only one is moving forward]

  • OLS staff have been preparing for CUNY First. Data loads will need to come from CUNY First to populate the Aleph patron database. As part of this process, Aleph will no longer use Social Security numbers as a primary key. Preliminary discussions have been held regarding passing information about outstanding library obligations (fines, lost book fees, etc.) to CUNY First and having these obligations result in registration and transcript blocks. In addition, discussions have been held about the interface between Aleph and CUNY First for the purposes of buying books.

Future plans:

  • Work with CIS to improve restore capabilities for the Aleph system

  • Consider implications of outsourcing support for library systems

  • Implement the Aleph Reporting Center system and pilot federated search service

  • Conduct CUNY-wide training sessions for each ALEPH module

  • OLS will continue to make progress towards an ERMS

  • Eliminate use of SSN as primary field within Aleph system

  • Develop working data feeds from CUNYFirst to Aleph system.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #41: Establish a procedure for financial review of proposed and existing academic programs

Team leader: Anthony Rini

Team members: Robert Ptachik

Summary:

The Department of Program Review, Articulation and Transfer in the Office of Academic Affairs reviews all campus proposals for new academic programs. This review includes the standard New York State Education Department (SED) forms which are required for registering an approved program. The SED forms examine program start-up (defined as 5 academic years) and capture cost projections for capital expenditures and program expenditures as well projected program revenue.Currently, revenue and costs are not captured in a consistent manner from campus to campus as the SED instructions are not very specific.

Progress toward success indicators and future plans:

This team has converted the New York State Education Department standard revenue and expense forms into Microsoft Excel documents. The next step will be to construct detailed back-up worksheets in Microsoft Excel to capture all possible revenue sources and program expenses and link these worksheets with the SED worksheets. This document is near completion, and then the team will meet with the Director of Program Review, Articulation, and Transfer for review.

OAA will begin utilization of this working document for all new program reviews conducted by The Department of Program Review, Articulation and Transfer in the Office of Academic Affairs. This form will also be available for campuses to conduct financial reviews of existing programs.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #42: Establish administrative infrastructure for new School of Public Health

Team leader: Anthony Rini

Summary:

CUNY is forming a university-wide School of Public Health to be sited at Hunter College. It will be a collaborative School of Public Health primarily involving Brooklyn College, the CUNY Graduate Center, Hunter College, and Lehman College, but other CUNY colleges will be involved as well. Dr. Kenneth Olden was hired as the Founding and Acting Dean of the CUNY School of Public Health , effective September 1, 2008.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • November 2008: Reviewed draft of proposed overview of CUNY School of Public Health structure and draft of proposed CUNY School of Public Health governance document.

  • December 15, 2008: Attended meeting at Hunter College which included Dean Olden, Provosts, and Vice Presidents for Finance and Administration from Brooklyn College, Hunter College, and Lehman College to discuss combined proposed SPH budget.

  • January 2009: Reviewed letter to the Council on Education for Public Health regarding substantive change in Hunter College’s unit of accreditation. Letter adds MPH specialization tracks (Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Health Policy and Management) and DPH program ((tracks in Community Society and Health (with a concentration in Public Health Nutrition), Epidemiology, Environmental and Occupational Health, and Health Policy and Management)).

  • January 12, 2009: Attended meeting called by EVC Dobrin to discuss combined proposed SPH budget. In attendance were Dean Olden, VC Malave, and Provosts and Vice Presidents for Finance and Administration from Brooklyn College, Hunter College, and Lehman College.

  • Met with Sharon Neil, Assistant Vice President for Finance, Hunter College, to review budget request and draft budget narrative.

  • January 27, 2008: Follow up meeting to January 12, 2009 meeting.

  • January 28, 2009: Approval of 17.5 new faculty lines: Hunter (13), Brooklyn (2), and Lehman (2.5) and approval of the letter to the Council on Education for Public Health regarding substantive change in Hunter College’s unit of accreditation.

  • June 16, 2009: Budget meeting and approval of FY 2010 SPH budget

  • June 2009-August 2009: Reviewed candidates for Executive Assistant to the Dean search.

  • June 2009: Drafted Associate Dean for Administration and Finance and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs position vacancy notices

Future plans:

Ongoing activities include assisting with accreditation time line and recruitment for administrative positions.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #43: Establish all funds OAA budget

Team Leader: Anthony Rini

Summary:

The Office of Academic Affairs (OAA) has a lump sum budget of approximately $58 million dollars in tax levy funds exclusive of OAA staff. The Office of Student Development (OSD) has a lump sum budget of approximately $9.7 million dollars in tax levy funds exclusive of OSD staff. Current full time and part time staff in OAA and OSD supported on tax levy funds is 339.

Lump sum funding is allocated to 23 CUNY campuses to support vital academic and student affairs programs as well as to support Central Office initiatives. In FY 2009, these budgets experienced a 15 percent reduction from the University Budget Office.

In order to better manage resources, this team worked to create an all funds budget for the OAA. In conjunction with this work, the leadership of OAA sought to make campus funding decisions more transparent and more clearly linked to program outcomes. The goal was achieved through the steps listed below.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • Reviewed of ongoing commitments to campus based programs

  • Reduced of lump sum budgets by 15 percent

  • Communicated transparency in OAA funding decisions (Teacher Academy)

  • Established 9th ledger Research Foundation fund for the OAA

  • Gained control of all 9th ledger funds in OAA for EVC

  • Linked funding decisions to performance targets (CUE)

  • Integratde Vice Chancellor for Student Development and Vice Chancellor for Research budget’s into OAA integrated all funds budget.

  • Reviewed 2008-09 program expenditures by department and category and formulated 2009-10 budget
  • Established internal controls on all OAA departments related to tax levy hiring, promotions, and reclassifications

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #44: Increase effective administrative oversight of SEEK/CD programs

Team leader: Cheryl Williams

Team members: Shelley Ast, Garrie Moore, Anthony Rini, Gordon Taylor

Summary:

This team sought to undertake 4-6 monitoring site visits of SEEK programs and obtain positive results.

Progress toward success indicators:

During AY 2008-2009, a team from the Office of Special Programs (OSP)--consisting of Cheryl Williams, Associate Dean of Special Programs; Shelley Ast, Director of Special Programs; and Omar St. Denny, OSP Database Manager--conducted monitoring site visits at NYCCT, Queens College, and Lehman College. Monitoring site visits are a long standing practice in opportunity programs. The purpose is to ensure that the programs are being operated in compliance with state and university guidelines and achieving the programmatic goals outlined in the program’s Academic Plan, the SEEK and College Discovery three-year strategic plan. Since 2006 there has been a shift in Special Programs towards evidence based management. Directors have identified the key student performance indicators to use as markers of student success–retention, first year performance, skills completion, CPE show and pass rates, and graduation. As a result, a major focus of the site visits now includes a review of the student outcomes in these areas. The OSP receives and circulates data tables from the University OIRA; the Database Manager creates bar charts reflecting five-year trends in the key areas and compares SEEK and regular admits at the college. During the course of each site visit, the team held separate one hour meetings with several constituencies, including: the Director, the counseling team, the academic support team, and groups of program students. The Associate Dean met with the vice president or dean responsible for SEEK at each respective college. The discussions center around program strengthens and challenges. The team wrote a summary report for each program. The reports provide observations and recommendations.

Future plans:

  • In AY 2009-2010, the OSP will conduct site visits of three SEEK and two CD programs. The time line is as follows: September/October - selections of colleges, review of OIRA data and preparation of SEEK charts; October - SEEK site visit #1; November - SEEK site visit # 2; December - SEEK site visit #3; January/February completion of SEEK site visit reports and review of OIRA data and preparation of CD charts; March - CD site visit # 1; April - CD site visit #2; May/June completion of CD site visit reports.

  • In AY 2009-2010, the OSP will begin the process of revising the SEEK and the CD Guidelines. The current Guidelines date back to 1994 and do not reflect current University practice and policy. The time line is as follows: September/October - hold discussions with Special Programs Councils to identify broad areas for revision; October - set & charge task force; May first draft due; May/June review by General Counsel.

Back to Goals Chart »


Goal #45: Rationalize and implement systemwide policies via new Office of University Registrar (OUR)

Team leader: Bob Ptachik

Team member: Annamarie Bianco

Summary:

This team worked to establish policies and practices connected with CUNY’s new OUR.

Progress toward success indicators:

  • In collaboration with Office of the University Controller, Enrollment Management, and Office of Student Financial Assistance developed a systemwide verification of enrollment policy effective Fall 2009.

  • In collaboration with OUC, EM, and OSFA revised and updated CUNY’s residency policy and procedure for students to apply and qualify for in-state tuition. Effective mid-Spring 2009.

  • Developed 2010-2011 Academic Calendar with expanded information regarding program adjustment period and withdrawal period so that these are consistent across the University.

  • Established a systemwide contract with Credentials (providing transcripts to former students) to ensure consistency in implementation across CUNY colleges. This contract ensures compliance to the University’s security policies to mitigate risk.

  • Developed various enrollment reports using the Administrative Data Warehouse to provide regular reporting on registration activities and enrollment numbers. With the implementation of the BOE application, daily enrollment reports have been archived for future comparison since February 2009.

  • Spring 2009 launch of the OUR Web page. The OUR site is designed to provide basic information about University policies and practices as well as links to a number of related sites. To date, over 4000 views have been recorded. (http://web.cuny.edu/administration/ur.html).

  • Throughout the year, the OUR has worked closely with the CUNYfirst team in the configuration and development process. Established regular meetings with OAA to achieve ERP decisions and communicate updates.

  • Developed consolidated Summer calendars on the web.

  • Developed uniform SIMS user access request form and central coordination for SIMS inquiry between campuses.

  • Develop 2011-2012 Academic Calendar